varved clay

varved clay

[′värvd ‚klā]
(geology)
A lacustrine sediment of distinct layers consisting of varves. Also known as varve clay.

varved clay

Alternating thin layers of silt (or fine sand) and clay formed by variations in sedimentation during the various seasons of the year, often exhibiting contrasting colors when partially dried.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the master core (S-2009) basal sandy silt (till) is overlain by reddish-brown varved clay (core depth 745-708 cm) in which 29 annual varves were identified (Fig.
Comments: The site is on a deep varved clay deposit (Connecticut Valley Varved Clay) on the University of Massachusetts, Amherst campus.
Consequently, the formation of bottom deposits may have been influenced by currents and wave activity, but the erosion areas are located near the deposition area--inside the bay (till and varved clay exposed on the seafloor) or on bordering peninsulas (bedrock).
5 km north of the city boundary, 2-3 m thick lenses of varved clay were found in the lower part of the sand layer.
In the coastal zone and areas around the inflows to the lake, the varved clay is often covered with a thick layer of silt or sand.
Very thin varves with a changing thickness and grain-size of the material in the upper portion of the varved clay are present only in few sites.
Lake Timiskaming (100 km long, 200 m maximum depth) is the postglacial successor to glacial Lake Barlow; Barlow varved clays are present below the floor of Lake Timiskaming as far south as the McConnell Moraine (Fig.
The other type of sand is formed as a result of submarine erosion of Late Pleistocene varved clays up to 30 cm thick (alternating varved horizontal layers of brown clays and grey silty layers) are located in the nearshore, whereas below the sand accretion terrace on the bottom surface there are traces of submarine erosion, indicating sediment transport in NW direction.