device

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device

1. a machine or tool used for a specific task; contrivance
2. any ornamental pattern or picture, as in embroidery
3. computer hardware that is designed for a specific function
4. a particular pattern of words, figures of speech, etc., used in literature to produce an effect on the reader

device

[di′vīs]
(computer science)
A general-purpose term used, often indiscriminately, to refer to a computer component or the computer itself.
(electronics)
An electronic element that cannot be divided without destroying its stated function; commonly applied to active elements such as transistors and transducers.
(engineering)
A mechanism, tool, or other piece of equipment designed for specific uses.

device

In an electric system, a component that is intended to carry, but not consume, electric energy, e.g., a switch.

device

device

(1) Hardware. The term refers to any electronic or electromechanical machine or component from a transistor to a disk drive to a smartphone. A device always refers to hardware, never to software. However, a "device driver" refers to software written to activate (to drive) a specific hardware device (see driver).

A User or Client Device
In general conversation, "the user's device" refers to the hardware operated by a person and may refer to a smartphone, tablet, iPod, laptop or desktop computer, but not to devices in a network (see network device).

(2) In semiconductor design, a device is an active component, such as a transistor or diode, in contrast to a passive component, such as a resistor or capacitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Totally implantable venous access devices (TIVAD) are commonly used for delivery of chemotherapy.
Accuracy of tobramycin levels obtained from central venous access devices in patients with cystic fibrosis is technique dependent.
Over the years, different kinds of central venous access devices (CVADs) have been developed to administer IV fluids and medications to patients in hospital settings, long-term care facilities, home care and in outpatient treatment.
In the United States, over 5 million central venous access devices (CVADs) are placed annually (Arenas-Marquez & Anaya-Prado, 2001; Herbst & McKinnon, 2001); almost 93% of patients receiving home intravenous therapy have a long-term CVAD (Andris, 1999).
Comparison of totally implanted reservoirs with external catheters as venous access devices in pediatric oncologic patients.
Catheter tip position in the analysis on central venous access device outcome.
It is estimated that approximately 93% of patients receiving home intravenous therapies have a long-term central venous access device (CVAD) in place (Herbst, Kaplan, & McKinnon, 1998).
3) Conformity to international color-coding for patient safety, identifying a venous access device.
Central venous access device, or CVAD, is a broad term that includes many types of catheters (thin, flexible hollow tubes) that are inserted into and positioned within a vein in the body to deliver therapies or withdraw blood.
Venous access devices are ubiquitous within the healthcare system.
An afternoon of pre-conference master-classes focused on central venous access devices, wound care and pharmacology.
Prevalence of the use of central venous access devices within and outside of the intensive care unit: results of a survey among hospitals in the Prevention Epicenter Program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.