VP

(redirected from verb phrase)
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Related to verb phrase: prepositional phrase

VP

On drawings, abbr. forVent pipe.
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Identify the verb phrases in the following sentences.
Unlike other works on the field of language change tracking by means of diachronic corpora, The Verb Phrase in English: Investigating Recent Language Change with Corpora, identifies and foresees possible drawbacks that researchers may face when dealing with linguistic variation and relatively small corpora that could not possibly allow generalization of findings.
The following table shows the mean of the acceptability ratings obtained for middles formed from each aspectual class of verb phrases.
The second level shows nominal forms and the third shows the verb phrase or syntagm.
There are several types of phrases, the major types being noun phrases, verb phrases, adjective phrases, adverb phrases and prepositional phrases.
The adverb occurs within the Verb Phrase immediately preceding the negative element.
The first one might be associated with the confusion over the finite/ nonfinite distinction since the first part of the verb phrase is finite while the second is nonfinite, the past participle form.
This predicate matches two verb phrases VPJ and VPE, the constituent category C is required for the category condition in the transfer rules:
There are two verbless clauses, four embedded headless relative clauses, thirty complex verb phrases and fourteen nominals incorporated into the verb phrase.
Notice that the word "need" could be considered an auxiliary in this verb phrase since its meaning is similar to the modal auxiliaries hare to and must; the three of them could mean obligation or necessity (Swan 2006: 342; Graver 1986: 46).
In example 14, it appears that the speaker was searching for an appropriate verb phrase, then settled on interruption to complete it.
Those would be the walls that publishers, general managers, marketers, advertising chiefs, and, indeed, some editors want to - choose your own two-word verb phrase - blow up, knock down, or rip out.