vernacular


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Related to vernacular: Vernacular architecture

vernacular

1. a local style of architecture, in which ordinary houses are built
2. designating or relating to the common name of an animal or plant
3. built in the local style of ordinary houses, rather than a grand architectural style

Vernacular

In architecture, vernacular buildings reflect the traditional architecture of the region originally developed in response to the climate, land conditions, social and cultural preferences, scenery, and locally available resources and materials. The forms are native or peculiar to a particular country or locality. It represents a form of building that is based on regional forms and materials, primarily concerned with ordinary domestic and functional buildings, rather than commercial structures.
References in periodicals archive ?
The second part constitutes the core of the book, in which Zhao studies the narratological development of Chinese vernacular fiction in terms of the narrator's position, narrative time, and the relation between fiction and culture.
The problem is that there are so many good reasons and rationales for any given tree species' name, be it vernacular or scientific.
If we accept a sense of the vernacular as style, incorporating elements beyond only the verbal, the importance of my second main point becomes clear.
Gallo also alludes in other works to the pathetic but somehow moving nature of vernacular signs, taking small hobby-store wooden panels of a cute deer or a skunk, tacking on a bit of canvas, and painting the whole thing pink.
The house is simple and very compact, its form, as well as echoing local and Mediterranean vernaculars, directly reflecting function and construction.
Whereas the comparison with Erasmus is insightful, especially with regard to the status of the vernacular languages, the opposition between Paracelsus and humanism seems based on a debatable definition of the humanist movement as represented solely by the Dutch scholar (105).
Leigh--Monk's and Everett's puns on the pathological model that is too often used to interpret African American culture and character and on the name of the popular black vernacular character Stagger Lee--is only 68 of the 265 pages of the novel.
Because so many of the roadside vernacular statues have been destroyed, Schwartz said, it makes it that much more important that Santa now has a place to go.
Souls Grown Deep: African Vernacular Art of the South, Volume One Tinwood Books, w/ The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library October 2000, $100.
He argues convincingly that ethnicities develop into nations whenever their oral vernacular becomes inscribed in a body of literature that is widely read or (much more often in pre-modern societies) heard and repeated.
In order to do justice to the range of subtle vernacular terms used by medical personnel around the world, a huge unwieldy list would have to be developed.
Arab writers were predisposed to adopt a pan-Arab "national" vernacular rather than one more locally referenced, thereby contributing to an ambiguity between local and pan-Arab nationalism that lives on to the present.