vernacular


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Related to vernacular: Vernacular architecture

vernacular

1. a local style of architecture, in which ordinary houses are built
2. designating or relating to the common name of an animal or plant
3. built in the local style of ordinary houses, rather than a grand architectural style

Vernacular

In architecture, vernacular buildings reflect the traditional architecture of the region originally developed in response to the climate, land conditions, social and cultural preferences, scenery, and locally available resources and materials. The forms are native or peculiar to a particular country or locality. It represents a form of building that is based on regional forms and materials, primarily concerned with ordinary domestic and functional buildings, rather than commercial structures.
References in periodicals archive ?
Royal Media Services (RMS) will be introducing four vernaculars TV services in Kenya under the company s strategy to consolidate and diversify its business.
After contextualising the vernacular oral tradition of the common law and its linguistic character, Sobecki moves on to his central thesis.
Dante justifies the use of the vernacular by addressing three points: first, the relationship of the commentaries to the canzone; second, the generosity of writing in the vernacular; and finally, the relations that exists between a person and his native tongue.
It is worth noting that Philip Ford's important book The Judgment of Palaemon: The Contest between Neo-Latin and Vernacular Poetry in Renaissance France appeared recently in this same series, to which we owe a considerable debt for advancing discussion on a topic of growing interest in Neo-Latin studies.
Environmental considerations of the vernacular roofs included roofing materials, climatic responsive roofs, and using natural resources, saving energy and providing comfort through the roofs.
Nicholson joins scholars such as Paula Blank and Carla Mazzio in complicating our understanding of this process of national self-fashioning and vernacular triumph, demonstrating how this older historical narrative and even its more recent iterations rely on a partial view of the classical account of eloquence.
I begin by considering recent scholarship on photoshops and vernacular discourse to suggest that this behavior is best regarded not as a series of artifacts (photoshops) but as a set of vernacular discursive practices where images and conversations continuously build on one another.
In the context of the long-debated role of Transalpine vernacular in the origins of Italian literature, Cornish demonstrates in Chapter III, 'Cultural Ricochet: French to Italian and Back Again', that volgarizzamenti did not follow a linear trajectory departing from the original, but created a linguistic dynamic affecting both the original and the target culture.
It represents the third book Dempsey has offered on the general subject of the relationship between vernacular culture and art in Renaissance Italy, completing the cycle begun by The Portrayal of Love: Botticelli's 'Primavera' and Humanist Culture at the Time of Lorenzo the Magnificent (1992) and Inventing the Renaissance Putto (2001).
The second part, 'Conversion', deals in three chapters with the way cosmopolitan Arabic was 'translated' into the vernacular traditions under consideration; with the way conversion to Islam is depicted in the One thousand questions; and with the characterisation of the two main protagonists of that tradition, the Prophet Muhammad and the Jewish scholar Abdullah ibnu Salam.
Chapter Two begins by surveying the early history of the alphabet and its first tentative uses, but the main goal here is to explore the significance of the first two known instances of vernacular literature, that of Ugarit and, later, Israel.
Hart builds on the work of Anita Patterson, Brent I laves Edwards, and Charles Pollard to call our attention to a unique constellation of vernacular poets from Scotland, the United States, Africa, and the Caribbean who are nonetheless engaged in a common intellectual project.