vernacular

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vernacular

1. a local style of architecture, in which ordinary houses are built
2. designating or relating to the common name of an animal or plant
3. built in the local style of ordinary houses, rather than a grand architectural style

Vernacular

In architecture, vernacular buildings reflect the traditional architecture of the region originally developed in response to the climate, land conditions, social and cultural preferences, scenery, and locally available resources and materials. The forms are native or peculiar to a particular country or locality. It represents a form of building that is based on regional forms and materials, primarily concerned with ordinary domestic and functional buildings, rather than commercial structures.
References in periodicals archive ?
User reactions seemed to pick up on the constructions of institutionality and vernacularity in the jefuchs image, which subsequently set the tone for other discourse and images.
In both the flower and watering can images, vernacularity emerges through how users construct their subjectivities as subjects of coercion by institutional entities.
As the case of the Pepper Spray Cop demonstrates, the practice of photoshopping tends to assert vernacularity in multiple ways but toward similar ends.
In this way, the vernacularity of their images and rhetoric may be construed as problematic insofar as photoshopping appeals most significantly to groups that already spend a notable portion of their time online.
This broad construction of vernacularity allowed Pepper Spray Cop photoshopping to gain a broader audience at the expense of some of its own transformative potential.
Its approaches and scope will provide valuable direction for further studies of vernacularity.
Just as important is the simple fact of its vernacularity.
Vernacularity itself is insufficient to rule out liturgical use; there were many common paraliturgical uses of the vernacular, particularly in prayers and hagiographical readings, and some were willing to allow the vernacular within the liturgy itself.