very long baseline interferometry


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very long baseline interferometry

See VLBI.

very long baseline interferometry

[¦ver·ē ¦loŋ ¦bās·līn ‚in·tər·fə′räm·ə·trē]
(electronics)
A method of improving angular resolution in the observation of radio sources; these are simultaneously observed by two radio telescopes which are very far apart, and the signals are recorded on magnetic tapes which are combined electronically or on a computer. Abbreviated VLBI.
References in periodicals archive ?
The science being done by this global Very Long Baseline Interferometry, or VLBI, Network is frontier astronomy.
Very long baseline interferometry measurements of the distance to the galaxy M106 (NGC 4258) favor a "short" distance scale for cosmological purposes, not a "long" scale (December issue, page 44).
That launch vehicle, scheduled for completion in early 1995, may find its first use in a Very Long Baseline Interferometry experiment planned for later that year.
The meeting explored the SKA Africa Readiness Strategy, co-execution plan and cost estimates for partner countries in hosting the African Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network (AVN) and SKA dishes.
Another technique, Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), acts as a kind of GPS for Earth.
This is the capability provided by very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), a technique that radio astronomers developed more than three decades ago.
They confirmed this information with very long baseline interferometry, in which a number of radiotelescopes on different continents observe a quasar at the same time and compare the signals to get information about the relative motion of the observatories.
The AVN is an array of radio telescopes across Africa as an expansion of the current global Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network (VLBI).
An important milestone was reached with the 'detection of fringes' in a joint very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observation.
Today, using data from satellites such as LAGEOS and the Global Positioning System, as well as laser-ranging equipment left on the Moon by Apollo astronauts and the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) network, it's possible to detect very minute changes in the Earth's rotation, on the order of a few millimeters a day.
Such a tecnique--called very long baseline interferometry -- is not new in itself, but the network's sensitivity is constantly being improved.
The technique used, called very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), has been used for decades for both astronomical and geodetic research.

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