viceroy

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viceroy

a governor of a colony, country, or province who acts for and rules in the name of his sovereign or government
References in periodicals archive ?
The examples dealt with in this study show that the ceremonies established at the end of the 16th century to acclaim the Hispanic monarchs at the royal court were transferred to the other capital cities of the kingdoms and viceroyalties of the composite Hispanic monarchy.
However, we know that this was frequent practice among the majority of the population in the viceroyalties insofar as individuals led somewhat hazardous existences.
In spite of the newly appointed regent, the balance of power within the viceroyalties remained unstable.
Present from the first times of the Conquest, his faculties were systematized during the reign of Carlos V, when the Viceroyalties of New Spain (1535) and Peru (1543) were created.
Containing more that 200 precious artifacts -- from full-size baroque altar pieces to finely crafted objects in silver and gold -- the exhibit traces the turbulent centuries from Columbus' discovery of the New World, through the Spanish conquest and the colonial era of the Spanish viceroyalties, to the independence movements of the 19th century.
The reorganization of pre-existing indigenous empires and cultures to export precious metals took place mostly in Mexico, Central America (except Costa Rica), and the Andean countries, especially Peru, Bolivia, and Ecuador, where the Crown established viceroyalties.
A PAN-NATIONAL EXHIBITION of some 250 works of art created in the Spanish viceroyalties of New Spain (which today comprises Mexico and the countries of Central America) and Peru (now the nations of Ecuador, Uruguay, Paraguay, Venezuela, Colombia, Chile, Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru), and in the Portuguese colony of Brazil has been drawn from public and private collections throughout the Americas and in Europe.
From New Spain (the Spanish viceroyalty that included much of the southern tier of the present United States, Mexico and Central America) and the viceroyalties of Peru and Brazil, over 250 objects have been gathered, dating from the beginning of the conquest in 1521 to the independence movements brought on by Napoleon's invasion of Spain in 1808.
Though technically part of the imperial system and on the same administrative levels as other viceroyalties, the viceroyalty of New Spain, like that of Peru, was recognized as a colonial dependency.
Although there was no single capital, Lima and Mexico City were the capitals of the original viceroyalties.