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(vēzā`), commune (1991 pop. 17,019), Liège prov., E Belgium, on the Meuse River and on the Albert Canal, near the Dutch border. It is a center of cement manufacture. The first battle of World War I was fought there on Aug. 4, 1914. After a fire the same year, the town was rebuilt. It is also known as Wezet.



a device designed to hold a workpiece in a suitable position. Vises consist of a body and two gripping jaws and are designed as machine (metalworking) or bench units.

Machine vises are mounted on metal-cutting machine tools for use in milling, drilling, planing, and other machining operations. Bench vises are mounted on workbenches and are used in various kinds of fitting operations. Anvil vises, for example, are used in chopping, straightening, and other types of fabrication in which the workpiece is struck. The jaws of parallel vises, both swiveling and nonswiveling types, are not as strong as those of other types; such vises are used in more complex and precise operations that do not involve striking the workpiece. Hand vises hold small workpieces for drilling, filing, and similar operations in cases where holding the workpiece in the hand would be inconvenient or dangerous. Specialized vises are available for specific metal-working applications, for example, vises with jaws bent back for use in chamfering.

In most vises, a screw handle must be turned in order to bring the jaws together to grip the workpiece. Wedges, diaphragms, cams, and other mechanisms are also used. Pneumatic parallel vises use compressed air to move and tighten the adjustable jaws. The size of a vise is determined by the width and maximum separation of the jaws. In anvil vises, these dimensions range to 180 and 200 mm, respectively; in parallel vises, to 140 and 180 mm; and in hand vises, to 15–45 and 15–4) mm.



(design engineering)
A tool consisting of two jaws for holding a workpiece; opened and closed by a screw, lever, or cam mechanism.

vis, vice, vise

A spiral staircase generally of stone, whose steps wind around a central shaft or newel; a screw stair.


vise, 1
1. A gripping tool, fixed or portable, used to hold an object firmly while work is performed on it; has movable jaws, similar to a clamp, which are brought together by a screw or lever.
2. SeeVis.


2 (US (often)), vise
an appliance for holding an object while work is done upon it, usually having a pair of jaws
References in classic literature ?
I then descended to the courts of justice; over which the judges, those venerable sages and interpreters of the law, presided, for determining the disputed rights and properties of men, as well as for the punishment of vice and protection of innocence.
The reader will here find no regions cursed with irremediable barrenness, or blessed with spontaneous fecundity, no perpetual gloom or unceasing sunshine; nor are the nations here described either devoid of all sense of humanity, or consummate in all private and social virtues; here are no Hottentots without religion, polity, or articulate language, no Chinese perfectly polite, and completely skilled in all sciences: he will discover, what will always be discovered by a diligent and impartial inquirer, that wherever human nature is to be found there is a mixture of vice and virtue, a contest of passion and reason, and that the Creator doth not appear partial in his distributions, but has balanced in most countries their particular inconveniences by particular favours.
I shudder when I think of the change a few years will produce in their paradisaical abode; and probably when the most destructive vices, and the worst attendances on civilization, shall have driven all peace and happiness from the valley, the magnanimous French will proclaim to the world that the Marquesas Islands have been converted to Christianity
Vice, a rogue who sums up in himself all the Vices of the older Moralities and serves as the buffoon.
It should come about as the result not of vice, but of some great error or frailty, in a character either such as we have described, or better rather than worse.
There has been no such Vice in Outland for many a long year, as he would be
He shall hold his Office during the Term of four Years, and, together with the Vice President chosen for the same Term, be elected, as follows:
Certainly virtue is like precious odors, most fragrant when they are incensed, or crushed: for prosperity doth best discover vice, but adversity doth best discover virtue.
He told him that he should try to do nothing to stain the whiteness of that apron, which symbolized strength and purity; then of the unexplained trowel, he told him to toil with it to cleanse his own heart from vice, and indulgently to smooth with it the heart of his neighbor.
Now, I said, you are on more substantial and almost unanswerable ground; for if the injustice which you were maintaining to be profitable had been admitted by you as by others to be vice and deformity, an answer might have been given to you on received principles; but now I perceive that you will call injustice honourable and strong, and to the unjust you will attribute all the qualities which were attributed by us before to the just, seeing that you do not hesitate to rank injustice with wisdom and virtue.
By that means I hope to save him from one degrading vice at least.
Chastity is a virtue with some, but with many almost a vice.