Villanella

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Villanella

 

a genre of Italian everyday vocal music of the 15th and 16th centuries that developed from the peasant folk song. The music of the villanella is of a light character; frequently, dance music. Usually the villanella is homophonic, often for three voices, and includes parallel movement of the voices. Villanellas were performed without accompaniment or to the accompaniment of the lute. The form of the villanella is stanzas with a refrain. There are love-lyric, comic, satirical, and game villanellas and villanellas dealing with everyday life. The villanella originated in Naples, spread throughout Italy (among composers of villanellas are D. da Nola, O. Vecchi, L. Giustiniani, and B. Donato), and then to other countries. In 16th-century France, there appeared a French variety of villanella dealing with pastoral life.

A. G. IUSFIN

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Part 1, "Walking My Llama Back Home," includes sonnets, villanelles, rondeaus, and a calendar poem as well as free verse.
The Old Woman Gets Drunk with the Moon" in one lyric, while a villanelle in dialogue with Sydney (Astrophil and Stella 31: "With how sad steps, O Moon, thou climb'st the skies") and Larkin ("Sad Steps") humorously laments the "sob, O butter-colored breast, / not a tub but a ton of this / mellifluous, unscented lust" ("Paean: Moon").
It is true sometimes Mahon just seems too pleased with his own intelligence, as in the irksome ostentation of "frugivorous" in "Last of the Fire Kings" and too many villanelles (the success of "Antarctica," the straining "solitary enzyme" apart) should be enough for anybody).
Written by Zoe Donaldson, a young poet who graduated Bates College in Maine just this past spring, "Nonesuch" is an elegy for her father, and the form it takes--a villanelle--was inspired by Elizabeth Bishop's villanelle "One Art.
This poem is a villanelle, a poetic form which weaves repetitions in a kind of wordmusic.
By 'Visitor' The Villanelle Overture We live in hope and die in hospital: What's put between these parentheses is Somewhat tragic and somewhat comical, Depends what's made of the phenomenal World's diversions: tell this to defeatists: We live in hope and die in hospital, We're not finished at that - the logical Explanation for all we see here is Somewhat tragic and somewhat comical.
A 'musical' child may be fascinated by the ostinato effect of a villanelle, a practical child may attend closely to writing up a practical project or keeping a naturalist's journal, a sports-oriented child may read voraciously about Kelly Holmes or talk with animation about Rebecca Adlington.
Generating as much disgust among modernists as did Barthes and Foucault, Turco resurrected rhyme and meter as well as traditional poetic forms like the highly complex villanelle and sestina.
Ensemble at first between mezzosoprano Charlotte Hellekant and Nelsons' orchestra was a little uncertain in the uncommonly brisk pace selected for the charming Villanelle, but the ship soon steadied, leading us through the most convincing account of this elusive work I have ever heard.
This mocking echo of a convention of the villanelle or sestina produces what might be identified as a phonically driven species of parody, as the hero's dire fate is evoked in the text's reflexive burlesque upon itself.
Meehan's poetry is resourceful and various: this book includes litanies, sonnets alone and in sequence, slant-rhymed couplets, Asian forms including the tanka and haiku, free verse, one villanelle that is a mantra for sobriety and a range of invented forms.
As if to prove it, they decided to reprint Plath's catchy villanelle, "Mad Girl's Love Song," in the afterword of the copy of The Bell Jar (1981) I read in high school.