viola


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viola:

see violinviolin,
family of stringed musical instruments having wooden bodies whose backs and fronts are slightly convex, the fronts pierced by two f-hole-shaped resonance holes. The instruments of the violin family have been the dominant bowed instruments because of their versatility,
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.

Viola

 

(violet) a genus of plants of the family Violaceae. The plants are perennial or, less commonly, annual herbs; there are a few subshrubs. The mostly stipulate leaves are alternate or in a radical rosette. The violet, yellow, white, or multicolored flowers are solitary. The corolla is irregular; the lower petal has a spur that includes the nectaries of the two lower stamens. The plants are characterized by the formation of cleistogamous flowers. The fruit is a capsule that dehisces into three valves.

There are about 500 violet species, distributed throughout the world. Most species occur in the temperate zone of the northern hemisphere and in the Andes. The USSR has about 100 species. The sweet violet (V. odorata), found mainly in broad-leaved forests of the European USSR, the Crimea, and the Caucasus, has been cultivated since ancient times as an ornamental and, sometimes, as an essential-oil plant. V. tricolor, a weed found in the European USSR and in southern Western Siberia, served as one of the parent species (together with V. altaica and several other species of Viola) of the garden pansy (V. × wittrockiana), numerous varieties of which are common in floriculture.

M. E. KIRPICHNIKOV

Viola

masquerades as Cesario. [Br. Lit.: Twelfth Night]

viola

1. a bowed stringed instrument, the alto of the violin family; held beneath the chin when played. It is pitched and tuned an octave above the cello
2. any of various instruments of the viol family, such as the viola da gamba

viola

any temperate perennial herbaceous plant of the violaceous genus Viola, the flowers of which have showy irregular petals, white, yellow, blue, or mauve in colour

Viola

An experimental hypercard-like interpreted hypertext system by Pei Y. Wei of Berkeley.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mum has been playing this viola for nearly 50 years and it has huge sentimental value to her, she is devastated.
The Deluge (Going Forth By Day) (video still), 2002, Bill Viola, HD colour video projected on to wall In dark room, stereo sound and subwoofer, 36 minutes; 370x488cm
This great honor comes with great responsibility," said Viola.
Witnessing that, Viola recalled how her father-despite her twice flunking the bar-had always reminded her that she was intelligent and responsible enough to make it, even though she sometimes did not believe it herself.
Photo of the cover of the debut album from Viola Beach
Radio 1 DJ Annie Mac, who has supported the band through BBC Introducing, playing the best undiscovered bands, tweeted: "Such unfathomable news about Viola Beach - a hugely talented young band at the start of their career.
Viola sagittata Arrow-leaved Violet flowers April, narrow shaped leaved
After Peter Biddulph made the loan to Mrs Bassano he endeavoured to sell the viola allowing, as was customary practice, potential purchasers to take possession of the instrument in order to assess and play it.
Dans cette paix subaquatique, Bill Viola invite le visiteur a se laisser porter par la lente variation des images.
The truth, however, is that the viola da gamba has nothing in common with the cello, with perhaps the exception a certain percentage of music, especially the basso continuo, which in many cases can be played either on the viola da gamba or the cello.
The incredibly rare viola was crafted in 1719 by the legendary Antonio Stradivari and is one of the 10 violas that have survived all these years, making it the world's most expensive instrument, the New York Post reported.
A Stradivari viola is the ultimate prize for collectors and the 'Macdonald' of 1719 is one of only two violas made during Stradivari's 'Golden Period' (1700 - 1720), which saw the production of his finest instruments.