virtual object

virtual object

[′vər·chə·wəl ′äb·jekt]
(optics)
A collection of points which may be regarded as a source of light rays for a portion of an optical system but which does not actually have this function.
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Computer-generated objects will increasingly become more interactive (responding to voice, gesture and even touch), more persistent over time (enabling users to leave a virtual object next to a physical one for someone else to find), and develop a greater understanding of the objects in their physical surroundings (such that they immediately react to changes in the environment).
This type of augmentation is obtained by using tracking system and a virtual penetrating mirror that can visualize at least one virtual object, as presented in Figure 8.
The employer has a registration as a privileged user of electricity and is entered in the register of the commercial participants with code number "cnm 155" and one virtual object with the code number "155 cem 01".
Light estimation means that ARCore is able to detect ambient light in the environment making it possible for developers to light a virtual object according to its real-life surroundings.
In the virtual world they were free to take any learning paths within the time limit (see below), and can click on any virtual object to learn its Chinese name.
A presenter could even be composited into a virtual environment, or a virtual object could be brought into the real world where physical movement could be tracked within the environment.
It requires that the virtual object can not only track the movement of the hand, but also facilitate the movement of the user's hand and determine the position of the user's hand, the position of the user, the bending angle of the fingers.
The projections of virtual objects are calculated so that the image observed by the user is fully identical to the image that would be observed if the virtual object was real and located at the appropriate point of the real space.
The aim of medical AR-based applications starts from a simple concept, to see through the virtual object and see the patient's medical information along with the patient.
This allows the user to see it, and by giving commands to the software, the user can manipulate the virtual object in the virtual world.
We examined subjects with transtibial amputation and nondisabled subjects as they attempted to control one-dimensional movement of a virtual object on a computer screen with EMG from the tibialis anterior muscle.
In October 2011, a team at Duke University in North Carolina reported that they had implanted brain electrodes in monkeys that enabled the animals to sense the texture of a virtual object.

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