viscera


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to viscera: abdominal viscera, pelvic viscera

viscera

[′vis·ə·rə]
(anatomy)
The organs within the cavities of the body of an organism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Viscera from 128 pacas were submitted for examination.
Dr Sudhir Gupta, who headed the three-member team that conducted autopsy on Sunanda, had in his report suggested sending viscera abroad as Indian labs did not have the technology to identify the poison.
Adding insult to injury, the viscera, commonly known as giblets, will receive the official USDA inspection legend and will be sold for human consumption even though it has not been inspected for wholesomeness by a federal inspector.
Thirty-two of the samples consisted of the uncooked muscular foot (78%); the remainder consisted of the viscera (n = 5, 12%), mucus (n = 2, 5%), and with 1 cooked foot and 1 cooked viscera sample.
Now the viscera report has come and the viscera report says there was no overdose of medicines at all.
Tras ser valorada por el servicio de cirugia, se realiza TAC con contraste oral (Figura 2) donde aparece un neumoperitoneo importante, sin apreciarse fugas del contraste ni perforacion de una viscera hueca.
Nodular plaques were present on the viscera and air sacs.
Mike Parker, past president of ALSGBI, said: "They have the potential for damaging organs and viscera in the abdominal cavity that the non-reusable ones don't and then there's the long-standing worry about infection in something that's going to be reused and put inside someone's tummy again and again.
Berthiaume of Northborough; her mother, Esther Viscera of Shrewsbury; her loving brother, Philip Johnson and his wife Paula of Douglas; several nieces and nephews.
BRUBAKER (1980) A warden pla Robert R p 4 t co in t viscera based
1983), while observing by arteriography the anatomy of the abdominal viscera and the lombar region in caprines, carnivores, swine and rabbits, report that the cranial mesenteric artery, in these species, is originated from the following branches: middle colic artery, the most developed branch, which anastomoses with the left gastroepiploic artery; ileocolic artery, where, in goats and rabbits, it is the first released branch; cranial duodenal pancreatic artery; and several jejunal arteries anastomose themselves, originating arches.
Later chapters cover injuries of the axial skeleton, appendicular skeleton and viscera, differential diagnosis, and dating of fractures.