pleura

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Related to visceral pleura: parietal pleura, peritoneum, pleural effusion, mediastinum

pleura

(plo͝or`ə), membranous lining of the upper body cavity and covering for the lungslungs,
elastic organs used for breathing in vertebrate animals, excluding most fish, which use gills, and a few amphibian species that respire through the skin. The word is sometimes applied to the respiratory apparatus of lower animals.
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. The pleura is a two-layered structure: the parietal pleura lines the walls of the chest cage and covers the upper surface of the diaphragm, and the pulmonary pleura, or visceral layer, tightly covers the surface of the lungs. The two layers, which are in fact one continuous sheet of tissue, are generally connected to each other. In humans, the pleural cavity is further separated into left and right sides by the heart and pericardial cavity. There is normally a slight amount of watery fluid within the pleural cavity that lubricates the pleural surfaces and allows the lungs to slide freely over the inner surface of the thoracic wall during breathing. When a lung collapses or develops an infection, a condition known as pleurisy can develop. The pleura becomes inflamed, and the pleural cavity becomes noticeably larger. Pleurisy can be extremely painful, but can be medically eradicated in many cases. Mesothelioma is a tumor of the pleura seen most frequently in asbestosasbestos,
common name for any of a variety of silicate minerals within the amphibole and serpentine groups that are fibrous in structure and more or less resistant to acid and fire. Chrysotile asbestos, a form of serpentine, is the chief commercial asbestos.
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 workers.

Pleura

 

the serous membrane covering the lungs and the walls of the thoracic cavity in higher vertebrates, including man.

Mammals have a pulmonary pleura enveloping the lung, and a parietal pleura lining the inner surface of the thoracic cavity. Within the parietal pleura are the costal, diaphragmatic, and mediastinal pleurae. Between the pulmonary and parietal pleurae is a fissure, the pleural cavity, filled with a fluid that is continually renewed. This fluid is produced mainly by the pulmonary pleura and is absorbed chiefly by the costal part of the parietal pleura. The volume of fluid passing through the pleural cavity in 24 hours is approximately 27 percent of the volume of the blood plasma. The pleural fluid decreases friction between the pleurae during respiration. The sinuses—storage spaces that on inhalation partially fill like lungs and increase in volume—are located between the pleurae, in the inferior part of the pleural cavity. The pleura is supplied with blood from the intercostal, internal thoracic, and diaphragmatic arteries. It is innervated by the vagus, intercostal, and diaphragmatic nerves. Pain receptors are concentrated in the parietal pleura.

pleura

[plu̇r·ə]
(anatomy)
The serous membrane covering the lung and lining the thoracic cavity.

pleura

the thin transparent serous membrane enveloping the lungs and lining the walls of the thoracic cavity
References in periodicals archive ?
Occasionally, the visceral pleural elastic layer is imperceptible, even with elastic stains, in cases for which tumor is in contact with the visceral pleura but does not extend to the visceral pleural surface.
This is a nonneoplastic lesion of lung tissue that is rolled into or folded into an area of fibrous adhesion between parietal and visceral pleura.
There is a case report of an open-lung biopsy showing slight thickening of the visceral pleura related to acebutolol (+1) (7).
Large lesions, as in our case, protrude into the pleural cavity with a vascular pedicle attached to the visceral pleura and are covered by adhesions.
Visceral pleura may demonstrate variations in the number and composition of tissue layers (between 4 and 6).
Invasion into underlying tissues, specifically adipose tissue and/or skeletal muscle under the parietal pleura and lung tissue under the visceral pleura, is diagnostic of DMM.
Trapped lung occurs when a fibroelastic peel covers the visceral pleura that prevents the lung from expanding and creates a negative pressure gradient between the lung and the chest wall.
Two-thirds of fibrous tumors of pleura are attached to the visceral pleura and more than half of these have a pedicle often measuring 1 cm in length.
The fluid exits by drainage into the lymphatics of the visceral pleura and the visceral circulation.
The ILS shares the visceral pleura with the normal lung tissue, and receives its blood supply from the aorta in 94% of cases and its drainage into the pulmonary venous system in 95% of cases.