viscosity curve

viscosity curve

[vi′skäs·əd·ē ‚kərv]
(fluid mechanics)
A graph showing the viscosity of a liquid or gaseous material as a function of temperature.
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References in periodicals archive ?
After applying Rabinowitsch corrections [21], the viscosity curve shown in Fig.
With this data and with some correction factors (Weissenberg/Rabinowitsch, Schummer, Dodge/ Metzner or Reiner/Philipoff) a viscosity curve across a range of shear stresses can be measured and translated into real results.
This, says Milacron, allows operators to compare new or regrind material with a previously tested batch and determine parameter changes needed to obtain the same viscosity curve and flow characteristics.
So the actual minimum start-up temperature is where the viscosity curve crosses the 300 cPs line.
The ion viscosity curve minimum and the subsequent strong increase can be attributed to the viscosity increase due to polymerization.
The melt flow test is carried out according to ISO 1133 and ASTM D1238, and measures one point on the viscosity curve under standard conditions.
This easy-to-use liquid yields dramatic increases in viscosity in typical surfactant systems as evidenced in the viscosity curve in Fig.
84 are relatively flat while the HMV melt viscosity curve shows much more shear sensitivity.
Recognizing that, Yu and Liu [12] applied the truncated power-law model and the Carreau model as an example of a smooth viscosity curve to the design of a coat-hanger die with a cavity of tear-drop shape and a linearly varying slot length.
My guideline experiments include cooling; viscosity curve with visual part inspection at each velocity; velocity-to-pressure switchover response, including momentum; pressure-loss analysis; short-shot study; gate seal; melt temperature; part temperature via infrared imaging (not expensive or time-consuming); second-stage pressure range; screw recovery; and cycle time.