viscous drag

viscous drag

[′vis·kəs ′drag]
(fluid mechanics)
That part of the rearward force on an aircraft that results from the aircraft carrying air forward with it through viscous adherence.
References in periodicals archive ?
The modern maxis like Comanche and Rambler have huge wetted surface so when they are not heeled, you're carrying a lot of viscous drag around with you.
If the tread rubber cannot penetrate the ice/liquid film to make contact with the solid ice underneath, the source of friction is not adhesion or deformation hysteresis (as for dry conditions), but rather comes from viscous drag of the tread rubber on this liquid film.
We neglect the influence of gravity and buoyant force because of their smallness in comparison with the electrostatic force and viscous drag.
The torque, generally measured by determining the reaction torque on the motor, is proportional to the viscous drag on the spindle, and thus to the viscosity of the fluid.
The resistive force or viscous drag on the surface of the body due to the motion of the fluid is known as the shearing stress.
It was realized that the injection tends to raise the boundary layer thickness, to postpone its separation and to reduce the viscous drag produced.
Viscous drag causes a thinning of the underlying paint.
The calculation procedure is based on the theory of hydrodynamic viscous drag presented by Maidla and Wojtanowicz (1987) for Bingham-plastic fluids in wellbores.
The primary action of streaming is through viscous drag forces exerted on the algal cells by the acoustically induced flow.