viscous fluid

viscous fluid

[′vis·kəs ′flü·əd]
(fluid mechanics)
A fluid whose viscosity is sufficiently large to make the viscous forces a significant part of the total force field in the fluid.
References in classic literature ?
She moved as one in the throes of some hideous nightmare--slowly, painfully, as though each limb was hampered by a great weight, or as she were dragging her body through a viscous fluid.
The flow of an incompressible, viscous fluid through a porous annulus has drawn the attention of several authors in the last three decades in view of its technological applications [2, 7, 8, 9].
The problem of the flow of viscous fluid induced by the sinusoidal wavy motion of a wall has been discussed by Burns and Parkes [5], who expressed the stream function as a Fourier series under the assumption of Stokes flow.
Keywords and Phrases: Free convective flow, radiation, buoyancy, boussinesq approximation, corrugated channel, and incompressible viscous fluid.
They found that a thin layer of less viscous fluid near either cylinder is linearly stable.
The feed channel is separated from the drive work chamber to allow high pressure filling for highly viscous fluid.
Finally, the addition of ammonia to liquid water creates a more viscous fluid, similar to lava.
For a viscous fluid the extra stress tensor is calculated by
In addition, waste management element is placed in at least a portion of the crotch region and contains an acceptance element having an Acceptance Under Pressure value of greater than about 0,50 grams of a viscous fluid bodily waste per square inch of the acceptance element per milliJoule of energy input.
BJ's services removes many particles mechanically through higher velocities achieved with a less viscous fluid than the flushing oil.
Indirect laryngoscopy mirrors with handle,Posterior rhinoscopy mirrors with handle,Thudicum nasal speculum,Instrument set for Laryngeal Viscous fluid injection,Litchenberger Endo-Extralaryngeal needle holder
The steady two- dimensional stagnation point flow of an incompressible viscous fluid over a flat deformable sheet stretching in its own plane with a velocity proportional to the distance from the stagnation point was considered by Mahapatra and Gupta [19].