visual angle

(redirected from visual angles)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.

visual angle

[′vizh·ə·wəl ‚aŋ·gəl]
(optics)
The angle which an object subtends at the nodal point of the eye of an observer.

visual angle

The angle which an object or detail subtends at the point of observation; usually measured in minutes of arc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stimuli were presented in Arial font and subtended 1[degrees] of visual angle at a viewing distance of approximately 57 cm.
Selective attention of global and local information: Effects of visual angle, exposure duration and eccentricity on processing dominance.
Three Visual Angles of Three Dimensional Orthogonal Axes and Their Visualization.
The size of the omitted area varied in steps from 10[degrees] x 10[degrees] to 40[degrees] x 54[degrees] of visual angle.
One of these stated that visual angle comprised between stimuli and observer's eyes is the source of these differences, since frontoparallel distances presented larger visual angles than depth distances (Levin & Haber, 1993).
exotica stays roughly the same, density and contours of individual ommatidia are kept constant, and both interommatidial and visual angles persist unchanged throughout an individual's life; hence the resolving power of the eye should also remain rather stable, even if the FFF were to rise as the animal grows and becomes faster.
This is Apple's professional-level program for creating DVDs with all of the bells and whistles found on commercial DVDs (chapters, motion menus, subtitles, multiple languages, visual angles, etc .
Columns define the dining room from the entry and allow interesting light and visual angles to entertain guests.
If a mainstream journal of visual psychophysics is opened, for example, it will be found that the measurement scales in use are visual angles (arcmin), luminances (cd/[m.
The main feature of the handbags is again extraordinary colored high-grade steel, which plays with the optic of human eyes through visual angles and the incidence of light.
Such a mechanism is possible, but there is no evidence that spatial updating mechanisms rely on this sort of process as opposed to ones that rely on visual angles related to location instead.
As the task became more complex, response time became much less sensitive to visual angle, such that response times were relatively high at the C2 and C3 complexity levels across all visual angles (Figure 4).

Full browser ?