visual flight rules


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visual flight rules

[′vizh·ə·wəl ′flīt ‚rülz]
(aerospace engineering)
A set of regulations set down by the U.S. Civil Aeronautics Board (in Civil Air Regulations) to govern the operational control of aircraft during visual flight. Abbreviated VFR.
References in periodicals archive ?
military aircraft would avoid flying near residential areas and instead fly over the water when taking off and landing at the two runways in a V-shaped formation under visual flight rules.
The race, sponsored by the Ninety-Nines, a women's flight association, is limited to women flying single-engine planes between 100 and 600 horsepower under visual flight rules.
The Bonanza pilot did not file a flight plan and was operating on visual flight rules, he said.
The TH-57 Sea Ranger is used to train several hundred student naval aviators with 45 TH-57Bs (for primary visual flight rules training) and 71 TH-57Cs (for advanced instrument flight rules training) in two helicopter training squadrons at NAS Whiting Field, Milton, Fla.
The database covers over 2,200 airports in 29 European countries and contains colored Visual Approach, Landing and Area Charts, as well as general- and country-related text sections such as Regulations, Communications, Meteorology, Aerodrome Directory and more for the planning and execution of flights within Europe under Visual Flight Rules.
Currently, NAV CANADA is working with Intergraph to produce and manage the visual flight rules (VFR) chart series.
We flew through a network of visual flight rules (VFR) checkpoints, reporting each one along with our next intended point to the controller at New Bangkok International Airport.
The report is the latest in the ATSB's 'Avoidable Accidents' series and presents case studies on the dangers of flying visual flight rules in deteriorating weather.
Three KLM passenger planes left Schiphol airport in Amsterdam on Monday evening - under visual flight rules - bound for New York, Dubai and Shanghai.
The aircraft mainly performed under visual flight rules, limiting their altitude to 3,000m (9,800ft), although one of the jets was taken to 8,000m to assess the atmospheric conditions.
The FAA has a category devoted just to this problem--"Continued Visual Flight Rules (VFR) Flight into Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC).
All published Instrument Routes (IR), Visual Flight Rules (VR) and Slow Routes (SR) can be selected as can military and civilian airfields within the United States.