vital


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

vital

1. essential to maintain life
2. of, relating to, having, or displaying life
3. 
a. the bodily organs, such as the brain, liver, heart, lungs, etc., that are necessary to maintain life
b. the organs of reproduction, esp the male genitals

VITAL

A semantics language using FSL, developed by Mondshein in 1967.

[Sammet 1969, p. 641].
References in classic literature ?
There is need for some care if the distinction between mechanical and vital movements is to be made precise.
If by the mere force of numbers a majority should deprive a minority of any clearly written Constitutional right, it might, in a moral point of view, justify revolution--certainly would if such a right were a vital one.
The literary histories might keep record of them, but it is loath some to think of those heaps of ordure, accumulated from generation to generation, and carefully passed down from age to age as something precious and vital, and not justly regarded as the moral offal which they are.
He was not waiting to see where I was going next, or what vital risks I was likely to run on the recovery of my freedom, but to congratulate me, and to give me Annabella's love.
Is it, then, so terrible to kill an enemy in war - an enemy who has surprised a secret vital to the safety of one's self and comrades - an enemy more formidable for his knowledge than all his army for its numbers?
DEAR MADAM -- I have unexpectedly received some information which is of the most vital importance to your interests.
Yet it is only in the East that poetry is truly appreciated, by those to whom leisure to look around them is vital as the air they breathe.
Sun Tzu said: The art of war is of vital importance to the State.
This is why the attainment of proficiency, the pushing of your skill with attention to the most delicate shades of excellence, is a matter of vital concern.
It is a secret for me alone, of vital importance for me, and not to be put into words.
Perhaps from this cause it has partly arisen, that almost all naturalists lay the greatest stress on resemblances in organs of high vital or physiological importance.
There the conquered athlete lay: outwardly an inert mass of strength, formidable to look at, even in its fall; inwardly, a weaker creature, in all that constitutes vital force, than the fly that buzzed on the window-pane.