vitamin A


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Related to vitamin A: vitamin D, vitamin C, vitamin B

vitamin A

[′vīd·ə·mən ¦ā]
(biochemistry)
C20H29OH A pale-yellow alcohol that is soluble in fat and insoluble in water; found in liver oils and carotenoids, and produced synthetically; it is a component of visual pigments and is essential for normal growth and maintenance of epithelial tissue. Also known as antiinfective vitamin; antixerophthalmic vitamin; retinol.
References in periodicals archive ?
The review gives many classical references such as the studies of Wolbach & Howe (1925) on the effects of vitamin A and the skin, and deals with the issue from a cosmetic point of view, ignoring the use of retinoids in dermatological treatment (even the use of all-trans-retinoic acid [ATRA] for acne).
Nine participants in the vitamin A group responded, compared with one in the placebo group.
Earlier work by Stephensen and others in the 1990s suggested that, although vitamin A enhanced kids' recovery from measles and other infections, it did not help, or perhaps even slowed, their recovery from bacterial pneumonia.
In animals pretreated with vitamin A for one day to five weeks prior to carbontetrachloride exposure, Sipes says, "the previously minimal injury has exploded to look like we've given a huge dose of carbon tetrachloride.
To make the water-soluble forms, Barua attached either glucose or glucoronic acid to vitamin A or its metabolite, retinoic acid.
Studying bovine papillomaviruses in mouse-cell cultures, the Vancouver group also discovered that a vitamin A relative called retinoic acid reduces viral DNA inside cells.