vitamin D


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Related to vitamin D: vitamin D3, Vitamin D deficiency

vitamin D

[′vīd·ə·mən ¦dē]
(biochemistry)
Either of two fat-soluble, sterol-like compounds, calciferol or ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) and cholecalciferol (vitamin D3); occurs in fish liver oils and is essential for normal calcium and phosphorus deposition in bones and teeth. Also known as antirachitic vitamin.
References in periodicals archive ?
As long as you're in a green, yellow, or red area--in other words, pretty much anywhere on the map--your body will easily make vitamin D when uncovered skin is exposed to the sun's UVB radiation in June.
Current government advice is that at-risk groups, including pregnant women, children up to the age of five, adults over 65, and people with darker skin as well those who do not expose their skin to sunlight, should take a daily vitamin D supplement.
The Vitamin D Foundation, however, points out that the earth's atmosphere blocks UVB rays early and late in the day and during most of the winter.
LeBlanc, which found no significant connection between menopausal symptoms and low levels of vitamin D in women's blood.
Most people agree that at least in high-risk individuals with osteoporosis, vitamin D has an impact on bone and skeletal health, but maybe not in those who are asymptomatic or in healthy individuals as a preventive tool," said Dr.
Our subsequent studies demonstrated that the vitamin D hormone downregulates renin gene expression by targeting the cAMP-PKA-CREB (cAMP-protein kinase A-cAMP-responsive element binding protein) signaling pathway that promotes renin transcription (4).
Butterfield suggests that people get their blood tested to determine their vitamin D levels, and that they consume foods that are high in the vitamin and add vitamin D supplements if needed.
A large number of the observational studies have suggested that there were benefits from high vitamin D - and that it could cut cardiovascular disease risk by up to 58 per cent, diabetes by up to 38 per cent and colorectal cancer by up to 33 per cent.
The investigators said several mechanisms could account for the link between vitamin D and anemia, including vitamin D's effects on red blood cell production in the bone marrow, as well as its ability to regulate immune inflammation, a known catalyst of anemia.
She quickly realised she had to follow the consensus of expert health advice, from cancer and bone health charities as well as dermatologists: up to 10 minutes exposure to the sun daily, without sunscreen, to ensure sufficient Vitamin D levels to protect bones.
Vitamin D is a steroidal hormone produced by the skin or absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract (GIT).
Active vitamin D has been shown to play a direct role in regulating transcription of approximately 3% of the human genome in over 30 different tissue types through vitamin D response elements (VDRE) on genes.