vitamin E


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Related to vitamin E: vitamin K, vitamin D

vitamin E

[′vīd·ə·mən ¦ē]
(biochemistry)
Any of a series of eight related compounds called tocopherols, α-tocopherol having the highest biological activity; occurs in wheat germ and other naturally occurring oils and is believed to be needed in certain human physiological processes.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a new study, researchers showed in prostate cancer cells that one form of vitamin E inhibits the activation of an enzyme that is essential for cancer cell survival.
But vitamin E enjoys a special relationship with two other antioxidants, vitamin C and alpha lipoic acid, that allow it to continue protecting the skin.
Given that more than 50% of individuals 60 years or older are taking supplements containing vitamin E and that 23% of them are taking at least 400 IU per day despite a recommended daily dietary allowance of only 22.
This study was conducted as 3x2 factorial experiment with three level of semi-refined sunflower oil (2, 4 and 6 percent) and two vitamin E level (150 and 750 mg/kg) in six treatments (include three replicates: 12 bird) and totally 212 Hy-line (W36) strain from 62 to 74 weeks in completely randomized design.
If one chooses to supplement with vitamin E in the context of preventing cancer recurrence, choose carefully and only select products with a mixture of tocopherols, and optimally tocotrienols as well.
This meta-analysis, a study of other studies published during the last 11 years, concludes there may be a very small increase in mortality associated with high dose vitamin E supplements.
Neuroprotective effect of vitamin E supplementation in patients treated with cisplatin chemotherapy.
Birds treated with vitamin E also have lymphocytes labeled CD-8 that kill infected cells and help eliminate foodborne pathogens.
Other studies suggest that vitamin E might protect the prostate, but the ATBC, says Albanes, "is the linchpin for testing it in the upcoming SELECT trial.
Those with the highest dietary intakes of vitamin E, a median of 17.
But when taken in megadoses, vitamin E also "makes you prone to bleed," notes Paul Dowd of the University of Pittsburgh.
By donating the hydrogen ions these free radicals are looking for, vitamin E protects cell membranes, he says.