vitamin K


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Related to vitamin K: vitamin E, vitamin D, Vitamin K Deficiency

vitamin K

[′vīd·ə·mən ¦kā]
(biochemistry)
Any of three yellowish oils which are fat-soluble, nonsteroid, and nonsaponifiable; it is essential for formation of prothrombin. Also known as antihemorrhagic vitamin; prothrombin factor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vitamin K was first discovered in 1935, when it was found to be an essential nutrient to prevent abnormal bleeding in chickens.
Vitamin K activates those blood-clotting proteins by making a small but vital chemical change in the proteins' structure, specifically on the protein building block called glutamic acid.
A National Institutes of Health study at Tufts University is currently examining the role vitamin K plays in bone development in the elderly.
For now, I suggest keeping your intake of vitamin K relatively low.
The Vitamin K Study is recruiting men and women aged 60 to 80 (the women can't be on estrogen replacement therapy).
The ECKO (Evaluation of the Clinical Use of Vitamin K in Postmenopausal Women with Osteopenia) study is looking for postmenopausal Caucasian women of any age.
Phylloquinone, the most common form of vitamin K, was the researchers' benchmark for vitamin K intake.
Exactly how much vitamin K is needed to optimize this function is still being established.
Since the discovery of vitamin K in 1929, researchers have sought a deeper understanding of its chemical mechanisms in order to further its clinical use, says Robert E.
We knew that oxygen combined with vitamin K, but we weren't sure exactly how," Olson says.
In several different types of lung cancer, including small cell, squamous cell, and adenocarcinomas, vitamin K induces apoptosis through activation of a "suicide protein.
Vitamin K targets tumor cells for destruction by stimulating oxidative stress, without toxicity to healthy tissues.