vocative


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vocative

Nouns of address (technically called vocatives, but also known as nominatives of address or nouns of direct address) identify the person or group being directly spoken to. Like interjections, they are grammatically unrelated to the rest of the sentence—that is, they don’t modify or affect any other part of it. Instead, they are used to let the listener or reader know who you are addressing, or to get that person’s attention.
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vocative

(vŏk`ətĭv) [Lat.,=calling], in the grammar of certain languages (e.g., Latin), the casecase,
in language, one of the several possible forms of a given noun, pronoun, or adjective that indicates its grammatical function (see inflection); in inflected languages it is usually indicated by a series of suffixes attached to a stem, as in Latin amicus,
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 referring to a person addressed. In English a special intonation expresses the vocative, as in Look, Jack.
References in periodicals archive ?
The O and oh here both express the vocative function, a plane where the two intersect.
146) Neuter nouns display syncretic forms in the cases nominative, accusative and vocative in both singular and plural.
The term bhikkhave should be considered instead to be a form of--what we are calling--an idiomatic plural vocative; that is, a vocative that is intended to capture a broader audience than is implied by the actual term itself.
We likewise examined if the use of the vocative was used to tone down the appellative force of the message and coded its use by differentiating between the absence of the vocative and the presence of a denotative or affective vocative.
78) This objection is not raised in any of the sources we have consulted, many of which endorse a reading positing furbis as equally plausible as an interpretation taking fur as a vocative noun.
The vocative case mentioned in his classification is considered a case marking which is ,oddly behaving ( Kibort, 2008).
62-63 who notices that the goatherd's ironical tone is also based on the vocative exclamation [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
In her more public war poems, Redden continues in the vocative mode but projects a plural lyric "we," as in the first poem of the book.
Frankly, the vocative "O" before a noun is deployed too often.
She evaluates that listeners need to be made aware of this, and marks the episode initiation doubly: she selects High Key, to project topic change, with the local meaning 'this may surprise you', and she uses the vocative 'chicas', (girls), to call everybody's attention.
Neither Musa nor Reynolds can translate the vocative real nati literally, though Reynolds does preserve the vocative; both deliver the meaning, and both deliver the powerful direct discourse.
The color green is placed much closer to the reader than white or black, thanks to the vocative interjection.