void ratio


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void ratio

[′vȯid ‚rā·shō]
(science and technology)
The ratio of the volume of void space to the volume of solid substance in any material consisting of void space and solid material, such as a soil sample, a sediment, or a powder.

void ratio

In a soil mass, or the like, the ratio of the volume of the void space to the volume of the solid particles.
References in periodicals archive ?
Suited for deeper applications, the system's 95 per cent void ratio significantly reduces the footprint of the installations.
It sets out best practices for using strain-stress data from the incremental loading of a soil sample in a standardized consolidometer (step-load test), one-dimensional vertical consolidation theory relating Ksat to the coefficient of consolidation (cv), the relation between Ksat and k, and the relation between the porosity and the void ratio of a soil undergoing primary consolidation.
Caption: Concrete Industry Management students mapped the Surface Void Ratio on an as-cast wall in metro New York.
The basic idea is that the response of a treaded tire is considered as the sum of the responses of two treadless tires with radii equal to the outer and the inner radius of the initial treaded tire, weighted according to the void ratio (the fraction of the voids along the tire perimeter to its total perimeter).
They also examined correlations between various soil properties and strength parameters and found that the mean grain size, sphericity, angularity, and void ratio play a role in the measured friction angles.
Influence of the void ratio and the confining on the static liquefaction in slopes in changi sand
A study on the relationship between soil shape factor, formation factor, void ratio and water content with electrical resistivity of soil was carried out by Han Li [7],
Also maximum and minimum void ratio depends upon the size shape angularity grain size distribution along with the test procedure adopted.
To obtain the parameters for the constitutive models it was necessary to test the soil in different states: saturated (to avoid capillary forces or suction in the drained triaxial test), dry (to avoid capillary forces (suction) in the consolidation and shear box tests), loose (for maximum void ratio and obtain the critical void ratio) and dense (for obtaining stiffness parameters and minimum void ratio).
Chen and Saleeb (2005) proposed that the shearing strength of samples with the same initial void ratio would tend to be uniform in undrained shearing tests.