volatilization


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volatilization

[‚väl·əd·əl·ə′zā·shən]
(thermodynamics)
The conversion of a chemical substance from a liquid or solid state to a gaseous or vapor state by the application of heat, by reducing pressure, or by a combination of these processes. Also known as vaporization.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ammonia volatilization from field-applied animal slurry--the ALFAM model.
Daftardar SY, Shinde SA (1980) Kinetics of ammonia volatilization of anhydrous ammonia applied to a Vertisol as influenced by farm yard manure, sorbed cations and cation-exchange capacity.
The recovery of cyanide for a new use can be accomplished by physical techniques such as volatilization and absorption.
Normally, addition of low molecular weight species to the compounds is of concern due to volatilization at high temperatures, and subsequent issues of dramatic change in properties or part shrinkage, for example.
Also, that "Fu and Alexander found that 50 percent of two to 10 ppm was lost by volatilization in one to three hours in lake water samples.
Heating of the organic resin matrix composition to a temperature of about 120[degrees]C to about 220[degrees]C results in thermal degradation and volatilization of the thermolabile group such that nano size voids are produced in the resulting cured organic resin matrix.
We can test the resistance to degradation or volatilization by doing TGA measurements on individual components as a function of temperature or, in bake simulations, as a function of time.
He ZL, Calvert DV, Alva AK, Li YC, Stoffella P J, Banks DJ (2003) Nitrogen transformation and ammonia volatilization from biosolids and compost applied to calcareous soil.
Volatilization and/or exudation during fabrication or end use does not occur.
In addition, water has a higher volatilization energy (the energy required to change a material from a liquid to a gas once the boiling point has been reached) than IPA.
Dilution, dispersion, biodegradation, volatilization, and irreversible sorption of a contaminant in the environment are among the reasons for a decrease in the bioavailability and toxicity of organic contaminants over time in the environment.
Nitrogen (ammonia nitrogen) loss with manure lagoons is reported to be as high as 70 to 85 percent due to volatilization and the large surface area of a manure lagoon.