volcanic theory

volcanic theory

[väl′kan·ik ′thē·ə·rē]
(astronomy)
A theory which holds that most features of the moon's surface were formed by volcanic eruptions, lava flows, and subsidences when lunar rocks were plastic. Also known as igneous theory; plutonic theory.
References in periodicals archive ?
Presence of these common clay minerals of volcanogenic derivation under local sedimentation conditions supports the volcanic theory of K-T boundary events (Fig.
The sequence at Anjar contains common clay minerals of volcanic derivation that are explained by local sedimentation conditions and support the volcanic theory on K-T boundary events.
1986) and Kam Chatka (Felitzyn and Vaganov, 1988) volcanoes preserved within the southern ice sheet being contributed by volcanism along Ross Sea (Koeberl, 1989), is evidence to support the volcanic theory.
The debunking of the volcanic theory was heartening news for the local people.
As evidence for the volcanic theory, these scientists have maintained that volcanoes can bring iridium-rich rock from the Earth's mantle to the surface.
Proponents of the volcanic theory have suggested that the Deccan eruptions caused the K-T extinctions by spewing out sulfur and other volcanic material that darkened the skies, cooled the planet and produced acid rain.
Courtillot concedes that the shocked quartz remains a problem for the volcanic theory, but Officer disagrees.
As for the K-T extinction, he stands by the volcanic theory.
Acid rain also plays a role in the volcanic theory of the origin of mass extinctions, whose strongest proponent, Charles B.
In support of the volcanic theory, on the other hand, Officer and Drake believe there is direct evidence for large-scale movement of magma to the surface around K/T time.