volition

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volition

Philosophy an act of will as distinguished from the physical movement it intends to bring about
References in periodicals archive ?
While this does not mean that risk factors for sex work were not present or operative in our sample, our results do suggest that escorts had, for the most part, volitionally chosen to be in this particular form of sex work.
Ergo, the desired conclusion: some complex actions can be done without the presence of a volitionally caused bodily movement because they can be done by an omission.
5 was "neither functionally nor volitionally severable" from the invalid provisions at issue, which set up affirmative action participation goals.
As was argued in our introduction, the voices within these discourses cannot lie side by side without orientating both emotionally and volitionally toward one another.
The atomism in this method of interacting with our environment assumes independent disembodied entities volitionally charting their own paths in pursuit of personal well being.
Steer suggests the best way to develop customer trust may be to go the step further and profile only those customers who deliberately and volitionally opt in.
En route, she volitionally interrupted her studies to nurse for five months in a typhoid hospital during the Great War.
Such knowledge should contain concepts that refer to behaviors that can be volitionally manipulated and systematically varied within the treatment process, and which are capable of reliable enactment across different helping situations.
The theory of planned behaviour extends the theory of reasoned action, which suggests that an individual's risk-related behaviour is controlled volitionally and can be predicted from a person's intention to engage in a specific behaviour (Reinecke, Schmidt, & Azjen 1996).
Likewise, lead-exposed rats volitionally consumed more ethanol in a free-access situation than did noncontaminated animals (Nation, Baker, Taylor, & Clark, 1986; Nation et al.
Traditionally, rights applied only to human beings because they alone can act volitionally, they alone can make purposeful decisions.