von Stroheim


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von Stroheim

Erich , real name Hans Erich Maria Stroheim von Nordenwall. 1885--1957, US film director and actor, born in Austria, whose films include Foolish Wives (1921) and Greed (1923)
References in periodicals archive ?
Suburbanites loved tikis but, said von Stroheim, "their kids just abhorred it.
DE MILLE </IR> and Eric von Stroheim seem to represent opposite facets of Griffith's achievement--De Mille encapsulated Griffith's capacity for creating popular entertainment, and Stroheim had his dedication to artistic integrity.
While working for a Hollywood movie studio, Indy finds that he is no match for wily, megalomaniacal director Erich von Stroheim when the two lock horns over the ever-increasing budget of Stroheim's film Foolish Wives.
The film, which stars Jean Gabin and Erich von Stroheim, is the story of captured French soldiers plotting their escape from a succession of German prison camps during WWI.
The director who was sacked from a movie after buying 1000 pairs of silk underwear for the extras because he said it would help them get a feel for their parts was Eric Von Stroheim on The Wedding March (1928).
Renoir's inspired "Grand Illusion" (1937) effectively utilizes Chaplin's metaphorical use of a flower motif to symbolize human fragility when a grief-stricken Erich von Stroheim cuts a blossom after the loss of a friend.
Starring Lillian Gish, Robert Harron, Erich von Stroheim (as a Prussian officer, of course), and Noel Coward in his screen debut, Hearts of the World gave the war movie its language and syntax.
The Wedding March'' stars director von Stroheim as a Viennese prince who agrees to marry for wealth and position to placate his family, then falls in love with a beautiful but poor girl played by Fay Wray.
The amazing Erich von Stroheim turned bestselling novel Greed into an eight-hour silent movie epic.
A chance meeting with Erich von Stroheim led him to work on Foolish Wives and Greed, films which set a new standard for realistic art direction.
Like McKellen's Richard, O'Hare's Hauptmann was a treasury of actorly finesses, both vocal and gestural, but in O'Hare's case they were inherent, not extraneous--a portrait of a certain breed of German-Americans whom one rarely sees on stage or in movies, where Germans have been glowering, decadent von Stroheim heavies for something like seventy years now.