vote

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vote

1. an indication of choice, opinion, or will on a question, such as the choosing of a candidate, by or as if by some recognized means, such as a ballot
2. the opinion of a group of persons as determined by voting
3. a body of votes or voters collectively
4. the total number of votes cast
5. the ticket, ballot, etc., by which a vote is expressed
6. 
a. the right to vote; franchise; suffrage
b. a person regarded as the embodiment of this right
7. a means of voting, such as a ballot
8. Chiefly Brit a grant or other proposition to be voted upon

Vote

 

an opinion expressed by means of voting. In the parliamentary practice of bourgeois states, the government’s general policy, its particular concrete actions, or the action of an individual minister may be submitted to a vote of confidence or no confidence. Since many countries do not have strict rules for posing a vote of confidence, every vote on government proposals in parliament can be regarded as a vote of confidence. The government itself can initiate and introduce the vote of confidence; it can propose that parliament vote on its programs or declarations or it can request a vote of confidence in connection with deliberations on a concrete legislative project. In the practice of bourgeois states a government based on a parliamentary majority frequently uses a vote of confidence to guarantee its stability and political authority. A vote of no confidence legally signifies a parliament’s refusal of confidence in the government. The initiative for posing a vote of no confidence can come from parliament or from the government itself; the latter, having received such a vote, loses the support of a parliamentary majority. The consequences of a vote of no confidence are varied. In Italy the constitution provides for an automatic resignation of the government; in such an event in the Federal Republic of Germany the president dismisses the government after the Bundestag has elected the new head of government, a chancellor. In bourgeois practice it does not infrequently happen that the chief of state, after acting in defense of the government, resorts to a dismissal of a parliament after a vote of no confidence.

IA. M. BEL’SON

References in periodicals archive ?
Back then he did not exude any warmth, clearly didn't approve of devolution, probably didn't approve of the PR list system, let alone the voteless by-election system that catapulted him into the Assembly - something of a cold fish out of water.
Yes, because if he (Mr Brown) then thinks at that moment he will come back to the voteless milch cow called business - he will be making a big mistake.
Of course minority voters, unlike out-of-staters in the Article IV Privileges and Immunities context, are not literally voteless.
The debasement of the voteless and voiceless people of the District of Columbia goes on almost unnoticed.
Politicians should plead to gain access to classrooms - not to grandstand as elected members but so they can hear from energetic but voteless citizens about what life is really like in the UK and Wales.