Vulgarization


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Vulgarization

 

the oversimplified presentation of any teaching or concept that distorts its essence; crude simplification, debasement.

References in periodicals archive ?
In The Vulgarization of Art: The Victorians and Aesthetic Democracy, Linda Dowling traces the course of the Whig assumption that aesthetic sensibility is available to all, and that each person may judge art for himself.
The rhetoric and disguised politics of orthodox neoclassical economics, a vulgarization of the theory, and an unsatisfactory, somewhat dishonest fabrication of statistics have been combined to convince the public that everyone will win with NAFTA.
Madeleine Lazard's biography of Agrippa d'Aubigne is an essay in high vulgarization intended to attract a general reading public (something that apparently still exists in France) to the works of a great but neglected writer.
Marchal underlines the importance of his forty years of institutional action as Secretary to the Academie Royale des Sciences, especially through his transformation of the stock Eloge into an instrument for vulgarization of the highest and deepest order.
By far the major part of the novel is devoted to an esoteric discussion or dialogue on subjects ranging from the role of so-called naturalism as opposed to idealism in literature, physical beauty as contrasted to intellectual beauty, the vulgarization of art by money and the media, and even racism, to the appeal of sex in human thought.
So perhaps it's not so odd that Lagerfeld has added haute vulgarization to his publishing repertoire.
highlights, somewhat humorously, the theme of the vulgarization of art.
As loaded as Greenberg's "Avant-Garde and Kitsch" (preserving the modernist's privileged order but using a virgule to link the Jetty's high-cultural address and the Spike's touristic mass appeal), Roberts's final chapter seems to portend a vulgarized Smithson--outside the permitted bounds, that is, of the ironic vulgarization wielded by the artist himself.
Benedetti reconstructs the stages and the routes of the complex itinerary of the Tabula in Italian culture from the fifteenth to the eighteenth century: the textual and linguistic rediscovery, the first translations from Greek into Latin, the interpretation of the work by humanists, the poetic versions and prose vulgarizations in academic circles and in those of the courtiers, and the cultural and literary assimilation from the Cinquecento to the literary rendition of Giambattista Vico.
Here, we might reinterpret Matta-Clark's cuttings in a new mode: not so much destructive, or deconstructive, in relation to architecture but constructive of an architecture that (finally) would embody the modernist spatial promise in a way denied by the systematic vulgarizations of modernity built by corporate efficiency.