wage curve


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wage curve

[′wāj ‚kərv]
(industrial engineering)
A graphic representation of the relationship between wage rates and point values for key jobs.
References in periodicals archive ?
It suggests that the wage curve, written in underemployment and wage growth space, is flat everywhere from an underemployment rate of 5 per cent and higher.
While he had his hands tied financially - Strachan's failed project had spent a lot of cash and left the club with a toxic millstone of a spike in the wage curve - he said from day one that he aspired to play 'Utopian' football.
His book The Wage Curve with Andrew Oswald won Princeton University's Richard A.
General Social Survey (GSS) data (1974-1988), they estimated the industry wage curve (wage as a function of the unemployment rate in industries) and the regional wage curve (wage as a function of the regional unemployment rate).
Meta-regression analysis (MRA), as explained here, helps readers to distinguish publication selection from genuine empirical effects, and these ten essays applies these methods to topical areas such as the effect of common currencies on international trade, economic freedom and economic growth, the convergence of the legendary two percent, the wage curve, the effects immigration on wages, the international gender wage gap and the income elasticity of money demand.
Finally, this paper provides prima facie evidence of the existence of a wage curve effect in Belarus.
The wage curve shows an empirical inverse relation between unemployment and wage levels.
In its own annual report, Rengo says it will strive to ''maintain and improve the wage curve.
Blanchflower and Oswald noted the "remarkable" uniformity of the results of their and others' wage curve studies across different nations and concluded that "every country seems to have a `wage curve'" (p.
Estimates of the NAIRU are usually derived either from a Phillips curve or from a real wage curve in an incomplete competition model.
Oswald, 1994, The Wage Curve, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
The problem is, the microfoundations of supply and demand analysis, including those of the Phillips curve, have recently been severely undermined by two major empirical (econometric) investigations conducted by conventional labour economists, published in 1994 and 1995: David Card and Alan Krueger, Myth and Measurement: The New Economics of the Minimum Wage and David Blanchflower and Andrew Oswald, The Wage Curve.