wager


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Related to wager: wagger

wager

1. an agreement or pledge to pay an amount of money as a result of the outcome of an unsettled matter
2. an amount staked on the outcome of such a matter or event
3. wager of battle (in medieval Britain) a pledge to do battle for a cause, esp to decide guilt or innocence by single combat
4. wager of law English legal history a form of trial in which the accused offered to make oath of his innocence, supported by the oaths of 11 of his neighbours declaring their belief in his statements
References in classic literature ?
I am minded to take your wager," said the Queen musingly, "and will e'en do so if you grant me a boon.
We have made a wager--a wager which could not have been foreseen, and of which I defy anyone to divine the true cause.
Fogg," said he, "it shall be so: I will wager the four thousand on it.
I wager that thou causest no beast to die, with or without the aid of Our Lady.
For once I would have taken him up upon his insulting wager.
Frank shall have this splendid chance; and I'll lay you any wager you like he makes the best of it.
Yes, but I am afraid there will rise up, by the side of us, a sect like that of Epictetus, you know him well; the philosopher of Hieropolis, he who called bread luxury, vegetables prodigality, and clear water drunkenness; he who, being beaten by his master, said to him, grumbling a little it is true, but without being angry, `I will lay a wager you have broken my leg
Don Quixote made no answer, nor did the horsemen wait for one, but wheeling again with all their followers, they began curvetting round Don Quixote, who, turning to Sancho, said, "These gentlemen have plainly recognised us; I will wager they have read our history, and even that newly printed one by the Aragonese.