Wainscot


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wainscot

[′wānz·kət]
(building construction)
A decorative or protective panel installed over the lower portion of an interior partition or wall.

Wainscot

A protective or decorative facing applied to the lower portion of an interior partition or wall, such as wood paneling or other facing material.

wainscot

A decorative or protective facing, such as wood paneling, that is applied to the lower portion of an interior partition or wall. Also see falling wainscot.
References in periodicals archive ?
Products: Solid hardwood and veneer cabinet doors, mullion doors, wainscot, drawer boxes, refacing program, moldings, wood veneers, all available unfinished or prefinished for residential, commercial and retail applications
Take the former owners of Ken MacBride's Prospect Heights listing, a brownstone with loads of original detail --stained glass, inlaid bookcases, wainscot and marble fireplaces.
Southern wainscot and silky wainscot, although not very inspiring to look at, are currently fairly scarce in our region.
Other converted homes included a three storey apartment with its original 17th century wainscot lobby with old oak joinery.
The wood grain is still crying out to be noticed in its wainscot.
They include a loft-style apartment in the former ballroom and a three-storey home with original 17th century wainscot lobby and exposed oak beams.
Within the wainscot landscape of her series, however, Rowling constructs a complete genre fantasy scenario.
A WAINSCOT wall panels make a room feel more cosy and they're great for hiding rough old plaster and pipework.
It is a massive stone structure with handcarved wood railings, mantels, wainscot, and paneling inside.
May 14, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Announcing a special recognition appearing in the April, 2014 issue of Morris Essex Health & Life published by Wainscot Media .
Built from Portland stone with furnishings of Austrian Wainscot Oak, a one-storey rear extension with Gothic detailing was added in 1932.
A report by Butterfly Conservation and Rothamsted Research found that the orange upperwing, bordered gothic and Brighton wainscot moths had all become extinct in the last 10 years.