waiter

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waiter

1. a man whose occupation is to serve at table, as in a restaurant
2. a tray or salver on which dishes, etc., are carried

What does it mean when you dream about a waiter?

Unless we have actually had a job as a waitperson, dreaming about being a waiter or waitress can be a straightforward representation of the feeling that we are being made to wait on others. If we dream about being in the customer role, maybe we desire to be waited on.

References in classic literature ?
She counted the money out to the waiter and left an extra coin on his tray, whereupon he bowed before her as before a princess of royal blood.
The gentleman from Tellson's had nothing left for it but to empty his glass with an air of stolid desperation, settle his odd little flaxen wig at the ears, and follow the waiter to Miss Manette's apartment.
The waiter who came into the room stopped, from time to time, to look at me.
Here one of the waiters, who had been for some minutes busy making a queer-looking mixture of egg and sherry, respectfully presented it on a large silver salver.
He had now finished his breakfast; but he was drinking a small cup of coffee, which had been served to him on a little table in the garden by one of the waiters who looked like an attache.
They were the family of William, one of our club waiters who had been disappointing me grievously of late.
The maitre d'hotel and several waiters came hurrying up towards the prostrate figure, by the side of which Major Thomson was already kneeling.
A battalion of waiters slid among the throng, carrying trays of beer glasses and making change from the inexhaustible vaults of their trousers pockets.
Neatly upon his left ear on the callous pavement two waiters pitched Soapy.
upon which a waiter came running out of a kitchen on the opposite side of the yard to show it, and seemed a good deal surprised when he was only to show it to me.
Pumblechook might have said, the lap of luxury - being entirely furnished forth from the coffee-house - the circumjacent region of sitting-room was of a comparatively pastureless and shifty character: imposing on the waiter the wandering habits of putting the covers on the floor (where he fell over them), the melted butter in the armchair, the bread on the bookshelves, the cheese in the coalscuttle, and the boiled fowl into my bed in the next room - where I found much of its parsley and butter in a state of congelation when I retired for the night.
Jane and Elizabeth looked at each other, and the waiter was told he need not stay.