wake

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wake,

watch kept over a dead body, usually during the night preceding burialburial,
disposal of a corpse in a grave or tomb. The first evidence of deliberate burial was found in European caves of the Paleolithic period. Prehistoric discoveries include both individual and communal burials, the latter indicating that pits or ossuaries were unsealed for
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. Ancient peoples in various parts of the world observed the custom. As an ancient ritual, it was rooted in a concern that no person should be buried alive. After it was adopted by Christians and as it is practiced today, the wake serves the primary purpose of allowing friends and relatives of the deceased an opportunity to adjust collectively to the changed conditions. Typically there are traditional songs and laments. Prayers for the deceased and eating and drinking by the assembled mourners are features of the wake. Wakes may vary from part of one night to three nights in length. See funeral customsfuneral customs,
rituals surrounding the death of a human being and the subsequent disposition of the corpse. Such rites may serve to mark the passage of a person from life into death, to secure the welfare of the dead, to comfort the living, and to protect the living from the
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.

What does it mean when you dream about a wake?

Dreaming about waking up (but remaining asleep) can simply be reflecting our anxiety about waking up in time. Awaking is also a common metaphor for realizing something. Also note possible idiomatic meanings, such as a “rude awakening,” a “wake up call,” or “wake up and smell the coffee.”

wake

[wāk]
(fluid mechanics)
The region behind a body moving relative to a fluid in which the effects of the body on the fluid's motion are concentrated.

wake

1
1. a watch or vigil held over the body of a dead person during the night before burial
2. (in Ireland) festivities held after a funeral
3. the patronal or dedication festival of English parish churches

wake

2
the waves or track left by a vessel or other object moving through water
References in classic literature ?
During the two wakeful nights in question, and immediately after the disappearance of Mrs.
I found myself weary and yet wakeful, tossing restlessly from side to side, seeking for the sleep which would not come.
Then he reminded himself how many nameless noises can be heard by the wakeful during the most ordinary night, and shrugging his shoulders, went wearily to bed.
But one of the girls who occupied an adjoining bed was more wakeful than Tess, and would insist upon relating to the latter various particulars of the homestead into which she had just entered.
It would not be worth mentioning for its own sake, but I was wakeful and rather low-spirited.
On this latter my bedroom window looked; and never am I likely to forget the vile music of the cats throughout my first long wakeful night there.
But the bed I made up for myself was sufficiently uncomfortable to give me a wakeful night, and I thought a good deal of what the unlucky Dutchman had told me.
But he could not get to sleep: he never felt more wakeful in his life; so he lit the lamp and got out the chess-board, and played himself a game of chess.
He heard a man yawn, and then, behind him, he saw the figure of a sentry rise from where the fellow had been dozing, and stretching himself resume his wakeful watchfulness.
One could almost hear a hundred people breathing deeply, and however wakeful and restless it would have been hard to escape sleep in the middle of so much sleep.
That proposed-to damsel lay on a wakeful pillow until the wee sma's, but her meditations were far from being romantic.
Having a private object of their own in view, the five wise virgins of Miss Ladd's first class had waited an hour, in wakeful anticipation of the falling asleep of the stranger--and it had ended in this way