wake

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wake,

watch kept over a dead body, usually during the night preceding burialburial,
disposal of a corpse in a grave or tomb. The first evidence of deliberate burial was found in European caves of the Paleolithic period. Prehistoric discoveries include both individual and communal burials, the latter indicating that pits or ossuaries were unsealed for
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. Ancient peoples in various parts of the world observed the custom. As an ancient ritual, it was rooted in a concern that no person should be buried alive. After it was adopted by Christians and as it is practiced today, the wake serves the primary purpose of allowing friends and relatives of the deceased an opportunity to adjust collectively to the changed conditions. Typically there are traditional songs and laments. Prayers for the deceased and eating and drinking by the assembled mourners are features of the wake. Wakes may vary from part of one night to three nights in length. See funeral customsfuneral customs,
rituals surrounding the death of a human being and the subsequent disposition of the corpse. Such rites may serve to mark the passage of a person from life into death, to secure the welfare of the dead, to comfort the living, and to protect the living from the
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.

What does it mean when you dream about a wake?

Dreaming about waking up (but remaining asleep) can simply be reflecting our anxiety about waking up in time. Awaking is also a common metaphor for realizing something. Also note possible idiomatic meanings, such as a “rude awakening,” a “wake up call,” or “wake up and smell the coffee.”

wake

[wāk]
(fluid mechanics)
The region behind a body moving relative to a fluid in which the effects of the body on the fluid's motion are concentrated.

wake

1
1. a watch or vigil held over the body of a dead person during the night before burial
2. (in Ireland) festivities held after a funeral
3. the patronal or dedication festival of English parish churches

wake

2
the waves or track left by a vessel or other object moving through water
References in classic literature ?
Mary," said her husband, coming in, with his overcoat in his hand, "you must wake her up now; we must be off.
If he does not wake to-day we shall understand what kind of a sleep it is, and his body will then be borne to a place in one of the remote recesses of the cave where none will ever find it to desecrate it.
I can't get to sleep very early at night, and I generally wake rather early in the morning.
That thought is like an illness to a mother; it tortures me at night; it wakes me in the morning.
Lucy always wakes prettily, and even at such a time, when her body must have been chilled with cold, and her mind somewhat appalled at waking unclad in a churchyard at night, she did not lose her grace.
he continued, "it wakes under the caresses of the sun.
said I, with a break in my voice; and they came back, hurrying and fearful, to the margin of the water, leaving long wakes of black in the silver.
He took the wand with which he seals men's eyes in sleep or wakes them just as he pleases, and flew holding it in his hand over Pieria; then he swooped down through the firmament till he reached the level of the sea, whose waves he skimmed like a cormorant that flies fishing every hole and corner of the ocean, and drenching its thick plumage in the spray.
In their train were minstrels, not unknown in London streets; wandering players, whose theatres had been the halls of noblemen; mummers, rope-dancers, and mountebanks, who would long be missed at wakes, church ales, and fairs; in a word, mirth makers of every sort, such as abounded in that age, but now began to be discountenanced by the rapid growth of Puritanism.
She looked round with blank eyes at the dirt and confusion on which the bright afternoon's sun shone dismally; it was all of a piece with the sad confusion of her mind--that confusion which belongs to the first hours of a sudden sorrow, when the poor human soul is like one who has been deposited sleeping among the ruins of a vast city, and wakes up in dreary amazement, not knowing whether it is the growing or the dying day--not knowing why and whence came this illimitable scene of desolation, or why he too finds himself desolate in the midst of it.
As soon as the countess wakes we'll be off, God willing
He was sleeping like one who wakes only for the Judgment Day.