waltz


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waltz,

romantic dance in moderate triple time. It evolved from the German Ländler and became popular in the 18th cent. The dance is smooth, graceful, and vital in performance. The waltz in Vicente Martin's opera Una cosa rara, produced in Vienna (1776), is regarded as the first Viennese waltz. This type was later made famous by the two Johann Strausses, father and son. The younger Strauss composed the Blue Danube Waltz, the most popular of the Viennese style. The waltz was introduced in the United States via England in the early 19th cent. Mozart, Chopin, Berlioz, Brahms, Richard Strauss, and Ravel have also composed waltzes.

Waltz

 

a dance for couples based on a smooth circling combined with a forward movement.

The waltz is accompanied by music with a 3/4 measure (more rarely 3/8 or 6/8) and a moderately fast tempo. It originated from peasant folk dances of southern Germany, Austria, and Bohemia. In the last quarter of the 18th century, the waltz began to appear in the city. Because of the ease, simplicity, and elegance of its movements, as well as the rich expressive possibilities of the music—passionately elevated, tenderly lyric, or brilliant and elegant—the waltz became the most popular dance of all strata of European society in the 19th century, as well as a very widespread musical genre. The Viennese waltz was particularly famous because of the work of J. Lanner, J. Strauss the Elder, and J. Strauss the Younger. Their waltzes were joined in cycles of miniatures (Walzer-Kette—“chain of waltzes”). An important step in the poetization of the waltz was made by Schubert. Eventually, waltzes began to appear in the form of larger instrumental compositions usually written for piano or symphony orchestra and close to the genre of the romantic poem (C.M. von Weber, Chopin, and Liszt). This symphonization of the waltz was especially characteristic of Russian music (M. I. Glinka, Tchaikovsky, A. K. Glazunov, and S. S. Prokofiev). Waltzes also continued to be composed in the form of lyric miniatures, sometimes arranged in cycles (Schumann, Brahms, and Grieg). The waltz can be the basis of an art song or operatic aria or part of cyclical compositions such as suites and symphonies (Berlioz and Tchaikovsky). It has been widely used in ballets, operettas, incidental music for plays and films, and so forth.

E. M. TSAREVA

waltz

1. a ballroom dance in triple time in which couples spin around as they progress round the room
2. a piece of music composed for or in the rhythm of this dance
References in classic literature ?
Helped and inspired by Buchterkirch, he will make the waltz the talk of the country.
There seemed no particular reason why the sale of that waltz should not have been as small and as slow as that of any other waltz by an unknown composer.
The band had begun the prelude to the waltz, and Francis Aldersley was waiting for his partner.
Give the little dear a good waltz, and we will look on," answered Mr.
From the rooms came a constant, steady hum, as from a hive, and the rustle of movement; and while on the landing between trees they gave last touches to their hair and dresses before the mirror, they heard from the ballroom the careful, distinct notes of the fiddles of the orchestra beginning the first waltz.
She had scarcely entered the ballroom and reached the throng of ladies, all tulle, ribbons, lace, and flowers, waiting to be asked to dance--Kitty was never one of that throng--when she was asked for a waltz, and asked by the best partner, the first star in the hierarchy of the ballroom, a renowned director of dances, a married man, handsome and well-built, Yegorushka Korsunsky.
It's a rest to waltz with you," he said to her, as they fell into the first slow steps of the waltz.
She expected him to ask her for a waltz, but he did not, and she glanced wonderingly at him.
There were few couples on the floor when they arrived at the pavilion, and the two girls essayed the first waltz together.
She warned him that she could not dance anything but a country-dance; but he, of course, was willing to wait for that high felicity, meaning only to be complimentary when he assured her at several intervals that it was a "great bore" that she couldn't waltz, he would have liked so much to waltz with her.
They're going to waltz again," said Stephen, bending to speak to her, with that glance and tone of subdued tenderness which young dreams create to themselves in the summer woods when low, cooing voices fill the air.
They had been absent so short a time, that when he went in again the waltz was not ended.