war surplus

war surplus

[′wȯr ′sər‚pləs]
(ordnance)
A military article of supply or piece of equipment that has been declared surplus because it is obsolete, unserviceable, or excess to current and reserve military requirements.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Lee-Enfields and a mixture of war surplus Mausers followed, until King Farouk, breaking away from British influence in 1951, ordered 37,000 Belgian-designed FN-49 semi-automatic rifles chambered for 7.
War surplus made optics affordable and accessible to his fellow optics enthusiasts.
Dad designed and manufactured a conveyor system, and he used a war surplus forklift to set bales up on the conveyor for weighing and tagging.
The decades immediately following World War II saw war surplus items integrated into civilian use.
Like the first vehicle, it made use of war surplus this time a former Air Raid Precautions control wagon which was converted to bank use.
It began after World War I as a retailer of American war surplus and evolved to today's international retailer.
Over the last 60 years, the Jewish state has received about $250 billion worth of warplanes and armaments, while the Philippines, at the time the United States had a naval base in Subic, got a trickle plus some Vietnam War surplus warplanes.
The business had depended on an engine bought from a war surplus sale.
Its history began in 1923, when Count Louis Vorrow Zborowski and his engineer Clive Gallop - who designed Chitty Chitty Bang Bang - built the original Babs with a war surplus American Liberty V12 aero engine.
He then dabbled in the war surplus business, made some money and returned to Lisbon where he set up a trading company.