warder


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warder

1 (feminine), wardress
Chiefly Brit an officer in charge of prisoners in a jail

warder

2
(formerly) a staff or truncheon carried by a ruler as an emblem of authority and used to signal his wishes or intentions
References in periodicals archive ?
Warder stepped down in 1882, but continued to work for forests as an agent in the Department of Agriculture until his passing a year later at age 70.
Meals were taken there and exercise taken with only the duty warders for company.
Mr Fiddes, 59, said: "Some of the documents go back to the 1600s and show the Yeoman Warders being paid in candles and coal.
And he'll be an even happier soul at the start of next month, when he is due to take an oath on Tower Green and be officially accepted into the order of Yeoman Warders.
Summary: Two Yeoman Warders at the Tower of London have been dismissed after an investigation into allegations of harassment.
The essay is Twain's review of the book The Cities of the Sun by George Warder.
As vice chancellor, Warder initially will focus much of his efforts on Pepperdine's Graduate School of Public Policy and serve as a senior fellow at the Davenport Institute for Public Policy, working closely with Dean James Wilburn.
While I was still a rookie warder, I was the sole guard minding Huntley," he wrote.
We're told that the warder took it as a racist comment because he is a black officer, and that he is now on long-term sick leave because he was so upset.
It was just seven years before his death that John Aston Warder led a group of early conservationists in Chicago to found what would become the oldest conservation nonprofit in the country, American Forests, in 1875.
In objecting to his release on bail, he told the court how Burns was shot and wounded by the warder but went on the run.
The Rev Paul Wilcock, head of the arms and armour group at the University, said: "I asked the chief Yeoman Warder if anybody had written their history and was surprised to learn that it hadn't been done.