waste rock

waste rock

[′wāst ‚räk]
(mining engineering)
Valueless rock that must be fractured and removed in order to gain access to or upgrade ore. Also known as muck; mullock.
References in periodicals archive ?
300-metre pile of waste rock accumulated during the mining process
Baby Hope comprises of three above watertable open pits, waste rock dumps, stockpiles and haul roads.
Foth has worked on the Back Forty project since 2006, conducting a series of technical studies, including geochemistry of waste rock and tailings, bedrock hydrogeology, water treatment, groundwater modeling, air quality and deposition modeling, reclamation planning, and tailings and waste rock storage facility design.
The ability to immediately remove the waste rock using XRT allows it to be placed back in the mine, eliminating tailings (defined as any byproduct of the mining process considered noneconomic or that needs to be disposed of).
The Screens Building, which was used to sort the coal from the waste rock and debris, dates from around 1904.
Due to the additional mine pit, more waste rock was expected to be dumped and a further extension of the original Otjikoto waste dump comes into play, extending the waste rock dump area to approximately 330 ha.
Besides leaving massive piles of polluted waste rock, the company caused a perpetual flow of highly acidic waters to stream down the mountainside and into the headwater of a creek that feeds the Umpqua River.
Hitch studies the value of mine waste rock for its CO2-sequestration potential, or "SP.
The company said about 18,000 metres are devoted to "condemnation drilling," designed to "sterilize" the areas where infrastructure, tailings and waste rock disposal may be located.
During its years of operation from 1938 to 1989, residents were allowed to haul away waste rock for use in their yards, and children played on piles of waste rock outside the plant.
Mineral oxidation in waste rock piles that contain sulfides increases subsurface temperatures within and below the piles (Ritchie 2003; Lefebvre et al.

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