watt-hour


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watt-hour

[′wät ¦au̇r]
(electricity)
A unit of energy used in electrical measurements, equal to the energy converted or consumed at a rate of 1 watt during a period of 1 hour, or to 3600 joules. Abbreviated Wh.

watt-hour

A unit of work equal to 3,600 joules; equivalent to the power of 1 watt operating for a period of 1 hour.

watt-hour

The power utilization for one hour measured in watts. Abbreviated "Wh," it is widely used to rate how long it takes for a battery to discharge. For smaller batteries, a milliwatt-hour (mWh) rating is used. For example, a 500 mWh battery means it will release 500 watts at a specific voltage for one hour before it is discharged. See ampere-hour and watt.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tables Table 1 Russian market volume of watt-hour meters, 2012.
The rover collected 161 watt-hours of energy on the Martian day ending November 13.
Definitions: A megawatt-hour (MWh) is one million watt-hours of electric energy or one megawatt of power used for one hour.
Six N-Stor360 fuel canisters, providing 2200 Watt-hours (180 Amp-hours) of runtime
television sets require considerably more than 74 billion watt-hours of power per year to operate, iWatt estimates.
The entire battery pack weighed less than 600 grams with a total capacity of 190 watt-hours.
Since our battery has energy density of over 200 watt-hours per kilogram of battery weight, which is more that eight times that of a standard lead-acid battery, use of the various electrical appliances proportionally has a much smaller effect on the capacity.
Phase 1 project goals include achieving 80-88 watt-hours per kilogram energy density, and over 300 watts per kilogram power density, with the ability to provide more than 600 deep discharge cycles, equivalent to a distance of about 60,000 miles.
When hydrated in the field, the P2 delivers an energy density of 860 watt-hours per kilogram, which is nearly 80% better than the incumbent battery technology.
Solectria noted that, "the batteries used in this race car had an energy density of over 70 watt-hours per kilogram, and a specific power of over 200 watts per liter.