wave height


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wave height

[′wāv ‚hīt]
(oceanography)
The height of a water-surface wave is generally taken as the height difference between the wave crest and the preceding trough.
(physics)
Twice the wave amplitude.
References in periodicals archive ?
Basic wave properties (mean wave height and various quantiles of wave heights) vary substantially along the eastern Baltic Sea coast (Fig.
Frequency of characteristic, significant wave height recordings in 2-m bins from 0-1.
The Tohoku-oki tsunami was the first to be measured by multiple DARTs right near where the quake happened, and was also the first mega-tsunami--with wave heights more than 1 meter in the open ocean--ever detected in real time.
Further on, we make an attempt to identify potential changes in the wave heights in strongest storms based on 99%-iles and 95%-iles of the modelled significant wave height for each calendar year.
Next, the basic statistical features of the measured, observed, and numerically simulated wave properties are discussed in terms of time series and monthly means of the significant wave height [H.
Combining wave height and wave duration data with other weather factors helps modelers parse through hurricanes with much finer resolution.
We analyzed sand wave length [lambda], sand wave height A, crest elevation tic, trough elevation tit, and sand wave asymmetry A in the detrended bed elevation profiles (Figure 4).
w]--relative wave height (vertical distance between two combs or two gaps);
Except for using all available observations at each day for the estimate of the daily mean wave height, no corrections have been made to compensate for missing values, for the uneven distribution of data, or for ice cover.
Satellites use altimeters and other tools to calculate wave height from above.
8 km per hour and wave height was about 2 meters, according to the meteorological observatory in Wakayama.
To avoid the complicated physics associated with along-coast changes in wave height and direction, most scientific studies of the nearshore have historically been conducted on smoothly sloping beaches with long, straight shorelines.