wave train


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

wave train

[′wāv ‚trān]
(physics)
A series of waves produced by the same disturbance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Featuring a catamaran hull and a water jet propulsion system, the Wave Train is the first boat of its kind to be produced for the oil and gas industry.
5m this year, with previous projections of pounds 6m in 2005 expected to reach up to pounds 8m on the back of demand for the Wave Train.
For comparison, the highest crests and the deepest troughs recorded in every wave train at each location are also plotted in Fig.
Figure 2 demonstrates that the initially symmetric spectra become notably asymmetric as the wave train propagates along the tank, in contrast to the behaviour of the PB spectra that retain their symmetric shape.
These findings demonstrate that the agreement between the analytical solution of the NLS equation given by (6) and the experiment is only maintained at the initial stages of the spatial evolution of the unidirectional wave train as long as the frequency spectrum of the surface elevation remains sufficiently narrow.
Featuring a catamaran hull and a water jet propulsion system, the 60-seat Wave Train was developed by Alnmaritec chief designer Dalton Linkleter, who is retiring in June.
He said: "A delegation from Alnmaritec will be presenting at a trade show in Mexico, and we expect this to lead to further contracts for the Wave Train 1600 in the Gulf.
5 kN horizontally in rails, 2 mobile point hoists 5 kN, 4 lighting hoists, gantry bridge Hauptvorhangzug, 4 tube wave trains 5 kN, 3 Hand Wind trains 2.
Specific types of ship disturbances, such as high leading waves, monochromatic packets of relatively short waves [5], solitary and cnoidal wave trains preceding a ship [6] and their associated depression areas [7], all qualitatively differ from typically occurring wind waves and from constituents of linear Kelvin wakes, and have been studied extensively during the last few decades [4].
Last but not least, the similarity of results obtained using the zero-upcrossing and zero-downcrossing methods suggests that ship waves are more similar to regular wave trains or groups than to freak waves.
Sometimes, however, the technique of interferometry -- combining wave trains, or signals, received from the source at different points and measuring the differences between them -- can yield information about stellar sizes.
Two wave trains received simulatenously from a single source at different observing stations will usually differ in phase, and the phase difference depends on the geometry of the source and the distance between the observing stations.