wavelength


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

wavelength

the distance, measured in the direction of propagation, between two points of the same phase in consecutive cycles of a wave.

Wavelength

The distance between two points on a wave which have the same value and the same rate of change of the value of a parameter, for example, electric intensity, characterizing the wave. The wavelength, usually designated by the Greek letter λ, is equal to the speed of propagation c of the wave divided by the frequency of vibration f; that is, λ = c/f (see illustration). See Wave (physics), Wave motion

Wavelength λ and related quantitiesenlarge picture
Wavelength λ and related quantities

wavelength

(wayv -length) Symbol: λ. The distance over which a periodic wave motion goes through one complete cycle of oscillation, i.e. the distance traveled during one period. Thus for a sinusoidal wave motion, such as electromagnetic radiation, it is the distance between two successive peaks or troughs. For electromagnetic radiation, wavelength is related to frequency, ν, by νλ = c , where c is the speed of light. Wavelength is measured in meters or in multiples or submultiples of meters; for example, the wavelength of light is usually given in nanometers while that of infrared radiation is usually quoted in micrometers.

wavelength

[′wāv‚leŋkth]
(physics)
The distance between two points having the same phase in two consecutive cycles of a periodic wave, along a line in the direction of propagation.

wavelength

For light waves or sound waves, the distance between two successive points of a periodic wave in the direction of propagation, in which the oscillation has the same phase; the distance the wave travels in one period. For light waves three common units of wavelength are: micrometer, nanometer, and angstrom.

wavelength

The distance between crests of a wave. The wavelength determines the nature of the various forms of radiant energy that comprise the electromagnetic spectrum. For electromagnetic waves, the wavelength in meters is computed by the speed of light divided by frequency (300,000,000/Hz). For sound waves, the wavelength is determined by 335/Hz. See optical bands.


Length of a Wave
The wavelength is the distance between crests. The higher the frequency, the shorter the wavelength.







Wavelengths of Visible Light
The wavelengths of light that humans can see range from approximately 400 nm to 750 nm.
References in periodicals archive ?
Key research finding of this research are as follows: --Native wavelength services revenue is expected to decline throughout the forecast period, as the market shifts to EoW services.
th] = 5333 b is the absorption cross section for unpolarized neutrons at the canonical thermal wavelength [[lambda].
Film critic, eye weekly Wavelength Calendar Leolo Dead Ringers Thirty-Two Short Films about Glenn Gould La Sarrasine The Heart of the World Neighbours Jesus de Montreal Atanarjuat
5 [micro]m, an infrared wavelength suitable for driving TPV cells.
Which form(s) of electromagnetic radiation has a wavelength less than the size of water molecules?
is a provider of wavelength stabilization solutions for the optical networking industry.
A geosynchronous satellite that hovers over the Pacific still provides observations at 12 [micro]m, but the one that now watches over most of North America uses the new set of wavelengths, says Ellrod.
Currently in early customer engagements, Ciena's CN 4200 multi-degree ROADM is an in-service upgrade to the existing CN 4200 platform through use of a universal line card that routes any wavelength or combination of wavelengths to any port on demand.
It includes accurate measurements of specific x-ray reference lines, systematic studies of x-ray transitions and absorption edges, and other accurate x-ray wavelength measurements that have occurred since 1967.
An ordinary laser emits only a single color because it's built with a light-emitting substance that naturally generates one wavelength of light when energized.

Full browser ?