wax myrtle


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Related to wax myrtle: crepe myrtle, southern wax myrtle

wax myrtle:

see bayberrybayberry,
common name for the Myricaceae, a family of trees and shrubs with aromatic foliage, found chiefly in temperate and subtropical regions. The waxy gray "berries" of the North American wild or cultivated bayberry shrubs (chiefly Myrica cerifera
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wax myrtle

wax myrtle

Shrubby tree up to 30ft (10m) with waxy pointy leaves. Stays green year round. The tiny fruits are seeds with light-colored wax, often used to make candles. Ironically, the wax isn’t really edible, but the leaves, roots and bark are quite useful for gas, bowel and liver problems, ulcers, colds, illness, astringent, anti-inflammatory, diuretic, antibacterial, immune booster.
References in periodicals archive ?
Observations were not made in Jun 2006 on wax myrtle at Site 1 (FLREC).
2002) and have a specialized digestive system that allows them to assimilate waxy foods such as wax myrtle (Morella cerifera) and northern bayberry (M.
The same bacteria that sustain Ceanothus perform a similar function for other important California natives such as white alder (Alnus rhombifolia), a towering tree with neatly scarred gray bark and lush foliage; mountain mahogany (Cercocarpus betuloides), a medium to tall shrub with high, arching branches; Pacific wax myrtle (Myrica californica), an enormous shrub with shimmering, fragrant foliage; and silver buffaloberry (Shepherdia argentea), a 10-foot shrub that makes a fine natural fence and resembles firethorn (Pyracantha) with its oval leaves, red berries and thorns.
Other hedge plants for backyard retreats include Mexican orange (Choisya ternata), Pacific wax myrtle (Myrica californica), Pittosporum tobira, and strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo).
In the northeastern part of the area is a sand ridge supporting turkey oak, sand live oak, wax myrtle, Chapman oak, and longleaf pine.
As sand traps diminish, golf course architects have embraced the indigenous: live oak, spruce pine, wax myrtle, palmetto and just plain old Florida wetlands, all placed at strategic points.