weak ground

weak ground

[′wēk ′grau̇nd]
(mining engineering)
Roof and walls of underground excavations which would be in danger of collapse unless suitably supported.
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He wrote in his memoirs, "I was the first president to test the principle of executive privilege in the Supreme Court, and by testing it on such a weak ground, I probably ensured the defeat of my cause.
First, "although Trump is great at rallying his supporters when he speaks, he has a relatively weak ground organization.
Peterson struck out David Greer and got Andrew Snow to hit a weak ground ball to get out of another jam in the second.
Though the Congress stands on weak ground in questioning the quit notice on the governors, the party seems to draw strength from a Supreme Court ruling of 2010, a year after UPA II assumed office, that held that a governor cannot be removed in an 'arbitrary, capricious and unreasonable' manner.
From its inception, the expression "Arab Spring" always appeared to be on rhetorically weak ground.
Moussa also had a surprisingly weak ground campaign that relied heavily on the man's persona and previous achievements.
Defence counsel Vijay Aggarwal has described the move as an attempt by the CBI to strengthen its case as it knew it was on weak ground.
He said: "When the Government is on very weak ground, it is characteristic to attack in an old-style political way.
The adherence of law helps to avoid several pitfalls and traps such as politicized prosecution, court trials on weak ground,
Burczak's attempt to fuse markets and Marx is on weak ground.
Similarly, ex-Italian PM Berlusconi's balloon that Italy should start using its own central bank printing presses to mint euros is a clear statement that the single currency is on very weak ground if Greece's electorate appears close to voting against austerity again on 17June.