weather strip

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weather strip

[′weth·ər ‚strip]
(building construction)
A piece of material, such as wood or rubber, applied to the joints of a window or door to stop drafts.

weather strip

A strip of wood, metal, neoprene, or other material applied to an exterior door or window so as to cover or seal the joint made by it with the sill, casings, or threshold, in order to exclude rain, snow, cold air, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Weatherstripping is tape that seals gaps between the moving parts of a window or door.
On Friday, Henshel told The Register-Guard that she was still working on the weatherstripping, but the heating and plumbing repairs had been made according to city rules.
A: You might be surprised--weatherstripping comes in a variety of widths and types, and even if you can't get an exact fit from the store, you can either improvise with a few types of weatherstripping or custom-order the size needed.
Weatherstripping at the outside edge slides against the curved glass walls of the rotunda and the floor for minimum friction.
For example, consumer expectations for vehicles with quieter cabins will promote sales of higher quality vibration control products and weatherstripping in motor vehicle markets.
If you have an older home, you could upgrade insulation, windows, furnace, weatherstripping, and caulking.
You can also apply weatherstripping between the sash and window frame--as long as it doesn't interfere with the window's operation.
It is aimed at gears, bushings, automotive weatherstripping, footwear, o-rings, seals, and films.
Tracks are added to the sides and weatherstripping is added to the bottom and top.
Often, our audits find that simple, inexpensive steps such as installing pipe insulation or caulking and weatherstripping on windows and doors can result in huge savings in heating bills and make apartments more comfortable for residents.
Weatherstripping and sealants also have been beefed up to minimize the edge effect (see Marvin and Norco, opposite page).