wedging

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wedging

[′wej·iŋ]
(engineering)
A method used in quarrying to obtain large, regular blocks of building stones; a row of holes is drilled, either by hand or by pneumatic drills, close to each other so that a longitudinal crevice is formed into which a gently sloping steel wedge is driven, and the block of stone can be detached without shattering.
The act of changing the course of a borehole by using a deflecting wedge.
The lodging of two or more wedge-shaped pieces of core inside a core barrel, and therefore blocking it.
The material, moss, or wood used to render the shaft lining tight.
References in periodicals archive ?
The wedging effect has been proven by microstructural research, conducted by Onabolu (1986), on concrete samples saturated with crude oil.
1), mainly due to the wedging effect, which does not occur in the case of water, but can occur in the contact zone between concrete and steel bars.
When compared with conventional straight stem designs, the lateral-flare stem showed substantially less migration during femoral head loading as the loads were transferred by a wedging effect between the proximal medial femur and around the lateral flare.