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weight,

measure of the force of gravity on a body (see gravitationgravitation,
the attractive force existing between any two particles of matter. The Law of Universal Gravitation

Since the gravitational force is experienced by all matter in the universe, from the largest galaxies down to the smallest particles, it is often called
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). Since the weights of different bodies at the same location are proportional to their masses, weight is often used as a measure of massmass,
in physics, the quantity of matter in a body regardless of its volume or of any forces acting on it. The term should not be confused with weight, which is the measure of the force of gravity (see gravitation) acting on a body.
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. However, the two are not the same; mass is a measure of the amount of matter present in a body and thus has the same value at different locations, and weight varies depending upon the location of the body in the earth's gravitational field (or the gravitational field of some other astronomical body). A given body will have the same mass on the earth and on the moon, but its weight on the moon will be only about 16% of the weight as measured on the earth. The distinction between weight and mass is further confused by the use of the same units to measure both—the pound, the gram, or the kilogram. One pound of weight, or force, is the force necessary at a given location to accelerate a one-pound mass at a rate equal to the acceleration of gravity at that location (about 32 ft per sec per sec). Similar relationships hold between the gram of force and the gram of mass and between the kilogram of force and the kilogram of mass.

Weight

The gravitational weight of a body is the force with which the Earth attracts the body. By extension, the term is also used for the attraction of the Sun or a planet on a nearby body. This force is proportional to the body's mass and depends on the location. Because the distance from the surface to the center of the Earth decreases at higher latitudes, and because the centrifugal force of the Earth's rotation is greatest at the Equator, the observed weight of a body is smallest at the Equator and largest at the poles. The difference is sizable, about 1 part in 300. At a given location, the weight of a body is highest at the surface of the Earth. Weight is measured by several procedures. See Mass

weight

The force experienced by a body on the surface of a planet, natural satellite, etc., that results from the gravitational force (directed towards the center of the planet, satellite, etc.) acting on the body. A body of mass m has a weight mg , where g is the acceleration of gravity.

Weight

 

the force with which a body at rest in a gravitational field acts on a suspension or horizontal support that obstructs the body’s free fall. The weight of a body P is numerically equal to the gravitational force acting upon it—that is, P = mg, where m is the mass of the body and g is the acceleration of free fall (or the acceleration of gravity). Since the mass of a body is a constant quantity (under ordinary conditions), but the value g changes on earth with latitude and altitude above sea level, the weight of a body changes correspondingly. At the same time the value g, as well as the weight, depends on the acceleration caused by the rotation of the earth around its axis; for this reason, the weight of a body at the equator is 1/288 less than at the poles.

Within a small field near the earth’s surface the value g may be considered constant and the weight of a body may be considered proportional to its mass. This assumption is used for measuring the mass of bodies by weighing them on beam balances; here the value g for the weighed body and the balance weight are considered identical. Spring balances measure the weight of a body; to determine mass when using them, it is necessary to know in addition the value of g at the point of weighing. Weight and mass are different physical quantities that cannot be considered identical; they are measured in different units—weight in units of force (newtons, kilograms-force, tons-force, and others); and mass in units of mass (kilograms, grams, tons, and so on).

A body immersed in a liquid or gas medium is acted upon, in addition to the force of gravity, by Archimedes’ force, which is equal to the weight of the displaced volume of the medium. For this reason, for example, a spring balance will show a lesser weight in an air medium than in a vacuum; for beam balances the differences in indications will depend on the ratio of the density of the balance weight to that of the weighed body.

A body at rest in an elevator that is moving vertically with an acceleration w will act on the floor of the elevator with a force F = m(g ± w) (plus sign when moving upward, minus sign downward), which is equivalent to an increase (overload) or decrease in weight. During free fall of the elevator (w = g), weightlessness occurs; such a state occurs for any body that is moving freely and progressively in a gravitational field (a rocket, satellite, and so on).

S. M. TARG

What does it mean when you dream about a weight?

Being weighed down in a dream may indicate that the dreamer is waiting for someone or something to change before they can feel unburdened in their life. Lightness, alternatively, often represents lighter, or more positive, emotions.

weight

[wāt]
(mathematics)
The unique nonnegative integer assigned to an edge or arc in a network or directed network.
The sum of the weights (first definition) of all the arcs in an s-t cut.
The nonnegative integer assigned to a vertex in a generalized s-t network.
The sum of the weights of all the arcs and vertices in a generalized s-t cut.
(mechanics)
The gravitational force with which the earth attracts a body.
By extension, the gravitational force with which a star, planet, or satellite attracts a nearby body.

weight

1. Physics the vertical force experienced by a mass as a result of gravitation. It equals the mass of the body multiplied by the acceleration of free fall. Its units are units of force (such as newtons or poundals) but is often given as a mass unit (kilogram or pound).
2. a system of units used to express the weight of a substance
3. a unit used to measure weight
References in classic literature ?
Higginson, and the outpouring of a psalm from the general throat of the community, was to be made acceptable to the grosser sense by ale, cider, wine, and brandy, in copious effusion, and, as some authorities aver, by an ox, roasted whole, or at least, by the weight and substance of an ox, in more manageable joints and sirloins.
He undressed and threw his nets, and as he was drawing them towards the bank he felt a great weight.
My decision, therefore, is that the fat challenger prune, peel, thin, trim and correct himself, and take eleven stone of his flesh off his body, here or there, as he pleases, and as suits him best; and being in this way reduced to nine stone weight, he will make himself equal and even with nine stone of his opponent, and they will be able to run on equal terms.
New York, situated as she is, would never be unwise enough to oppose a feeble and unsupported flank to the weight of that confederacy.
The number of wars which have happened or will happen in the world will always be found to be in proportion to the number and weight of the causes, whether REAL or PRETENDED, which PROVOKE or INVITE them.
It has been admitted, that this objection, if well supported, would have great weight.
The result is that they are infinitely less agile and less powerful, in proportion to their weight, than an Earth man, and I doubt that were one of them suddenly to be transported to Earth he could lift his own weight from the ground; in fact, I am convinced that he could not do so.
He hoped that the weight of earth would not be so great that he could not overcome it.
Willey, their five children, and two hired men were crushed under the weight of earth, rocks, and trees.
The gentle master stevedore had his hands very full at last; and the chief mate became worried in his mind as to the proper distribution of the weight of his first cargo in a ship he did not personally know before.
How convenient it would be," Lady Muriel laughingly remarked, a propos of my having insisted on saving her the trouble of carrying a cup of tea across the room to the Earl, "if cups of tea had no weight at all
Satisfied by his scrutiny, my light limbed companion swung himself nimbly upon it, and twisting his legs round it in sailor fashion, slipped down eight or ten feet, where his weight gave it a motion not un-like that of a pendulum.